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What to call the Nasdaq halt? We asked on Twitter

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So much for technology. As the Nasdaq tries to figure out why it couldn't process trades for hours on Thursday, investors outside the exchange are trying to figure out what to name the event. Three years ago we had the Flash Crash. A year ago there was the Facebook Flub.

But this?

CNBC contributor Josh Brown suggests we call the meltdown "The Flash Freeze," because what started as a flash … froze ... all afternoon. How hard could it be to fix the problem? As @apsduke tweeted, "NASDAQ I.T. head just has to answer 'my first pet's name?' "


Perhaps the event deserves a name that encompasses all the problems in electronic trading recently. Even Hitler is shocked that such things could still happen in 2013. Yes, even before the shutdown was over, it had been parodied in the well-worn clip from "Downfall." Click here to watch it.

This is a big deal. Trading in Apple stopped for three hours. No Apple for three hours. Panicked investors discovered for the first time that there are 499 other stocks in the S&P 500.

So what to call it? I sought suggestions from Twitter and added a few of my own. Here they are.

BROKEBACK MARKET
FUBAR
STOP TRADING!
NASDEAD
NASFAIL
Nas-Lack
NASduh
NASdaquiri (the IT department had a long lunch?)
NASDON'T™ (Yes, it's already trademarked.)

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On the upside, think of all the traders who didn't lose money for three hours! Still, they didn't make money, either.

"Hitler" complains that he's stuck with Google bids at $50 and Netflix at $10. "I bet if Elon Musk owned the stock market, we wouldn't be having these problems," he tells his trembling aides. "He makes electric cars and flies through tubes."

Thanks for name suggestions from @TheAcsMan, @_ChicagoEDBHome, @IgorGreenwald, @bucksbbq, @IvanTheK and CNBC's own @EamonJavers.

—By CNBC's Jane Wells; Follow her on Twitter: @janewells

  • Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells is a CNBC business news reporter and also writes the Funny Business blog for CNBC.com.

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