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5.3 magnitude earthquake strikes Japan's Fukushima

This is a satellite image of the Fukushima Nuclear Reactor in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture.
DigitalGlobe | Scapeware 3D | Getty Images
This is a satellite image of the Fukushima Nuclear Reactor in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture.

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 5.8 struck Fukushima Prefecture in Japan early Friday morning, Kyodo reported, quoting the Japan Meteorological Agency.

No tsunami warning has been issued, the news agency said.

(Read more: Japan pledges $473 million to contain Fukushima leak)

The focus of the quake was around 20 km (12.4 miles) underground in the prefecture, which hosts Tokyo Electric Power Co Inc's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Kyodo said.

(Read more: Is nuclear disaster looming in Japan?)

Japanese Prime Minister Shinz Abe (2nd R), told Fukushima's operator to fix radioactive water leaks as he toured the crippled nuclear plant on September 19, less than two weeks after assuring the world the situation was under control.
Japan Pool | AFP | Getty Images
Japanese Prime Minister Shinz Abe (2nd R), told Fukushima's operator to fix radioactive water leaks as he toured the crippled nuclear plant on September 19, less than two weeks after assuring the world the situation was under control.

There was no damage to the nuclear plant, Japanese media quoted Tokyo Electric as saying.

(Read more: Japan nuclear body says radioactive water at Fukushima an 'emergency')

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe instructed Tokyo Electric on Thursday to decommission the remaining two reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, where four other reactors were devastated by a massive earthquake in 2011.

U.S. Geological Survey said on its website that the earthquake's magnitude was 5.3.

—By Reuters

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