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Aston Martin signed by Michael Jordan, others up for auction

When you're spending six figures or more on a luxury sports car, most people inspect every inch to make sure there are no marks on it, but this 2002 Aston Martin Vanquish is the ultimate exception to that rule—the more marked up, the more valuable it is.

"It's a one-of-a-kind car to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Basketball Hall of Fame. They went out to create what they thought would be the most valuable basketball collectible ever produced," Ken Goldin, founder of Goldin Auctions, the company selling this basketball-themed luxury vehicle, told CNBC.

In 2009, the supercar was placed outside the entrance to the ceremony where basketball legends Michael Jordan, David Robinson and John Stockton were being inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Some of the best basketball players in the world were in attendance and they signed the car as they walked the red carpet, making this the only car on the planet with signatures from 50 basketball Hall of Famers.

"This was a piece of history for the 50th anniversary Hall of Fame as well as the induction of Michael Jordan, and that is where all the value is," Goldin said.

2002 Aston Martin Vanquish featuring 50 N.B.A. Hall of Fame athletes’ signatures
Source: GoldinAuctions.com
2002 Aston Martin Vanquish featuring 50 N.B.A. Hall of Fame athletes’ signatures

And that value means big money for owner and avid car collector, Geoff Abadee.

"When I bought the car I paid approximately $200,000," he said. "What makes it really valuable is the collective amounts of signatures on the car."

Those 50 famous Hancocks have increased the total value of the car by a whopping 525 percent.

"It's priced for $1.25 million by a professional appraiser," Abadee said. He told CNBC he plans to donate some of the proceeds from the sale to charity.

Abadee said he's collected about 40 or 50 cars over the years.

"I would have spent a few million dollars on different cars—Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Aston Martins, but mainly exotics," he said.

But for this supercar collector, these are more than just classic cars. "Some people will pay a lot of money for Picassos and stand there and look at it on the wall ... that's the beautiful thing about cars—that's my artwork," he said.

—By CNBC's Erica Emmich.

Ultimate Insider