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The $5,000 cocktail, and other pricey drinks

So much for government estimates that put the average American's annual "dining out" budget at around $3,000. These days, it's possible to blow that on just a few premium cocktails.

To be sure, super-expensive cocktails aren't unheard of. Case in point: At the Kentucky Derby, there's a $1,000 mint julep that comes in a gold-plated, hand-engraved cup and a gold-plated sipping straw, among other adornments. Drinks with four-figure price tags at other bars and restaurants typically come adorned with a diamond necklace or cuff links, vintage cocktail shaker or other inedible add-ons.

This newest crop of cocktails, however, eliminates the bling. Instead, they take a leaf from the growing craft cocktail movement, putting the emphasis (and price) squarely on high-end, limited edition spirits that imbibers would be less likely to otherwise sample. For example, this spring, XS Nightclub in Las Vegas introduced the $5,000 Five Star, which includes a taste of $22,000-per-bottle Rémy Martin Louis XIII Rare Cask 42.6.

The new splurges aren't one-offs like the current Guinness record-holder, the $12,970 "Winston"—which incorporated rare Croizet 1858 Cuvée Leonie cognac (which itself set records as the most expensive cognac sold at auction), and was sold at Melbourne's Club 23 in 2013.

Click ahead to see six cocktail splurges that are regular menu offerings for anyone with cash to spare.

—By CNBC's Kelli B. Grant
Posted 26 April 2014

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