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US entering a recession? That's what trader claims

The U.S. is entering a recession right now, trader Douglas Borthwick told CNBC's "Closing Bell" Tuesday.

He pointed to recent data to bolster his claim, including last quarter's gross domestic product, which only grew 0.1 percent. The jobs offerings relative to employment also paints a bleak picture, Borthwick said.

"The last time we saw this divergence was 2007, when we entered into a recession," said Borthwick, head of foreign exchange for Chapdelaine & Co.

Additionally, Borthwick expects the durable goods number next week to be negative, which he said will lead people to lower their GDP estimates.

Noted stock picker Bill Miller disagreed with Borthwick's thesis.

"If a recession has started it will be the most unusual recession in U.S. history because first time claims are at cycle lows, wage growth is at cycle highs, the Fed is easing … earnings estimates are rising and the yield curve is positive," Miller told "Closing Bell."

Read More4 reasons US is recovering...and leaving the world behind


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Although the economy barely grew in the first quarter, Philadelphia Federal Reserve President Charles Plosser said Tuesday he expects the economy to expand 3 percent this year, a faster pace than expected. That could possibly force the Fed to raise interest rates sooner than expected.

Read More Fed's Plosser: If economy improves as forecast, current taper pace may be too slow

Borthwick admitted his recession prediction is a "way out there call," but said economic growth has been covered by quantitative easing, which is lifting.

"This quantitative easing has slowly been dripping and dripping away and we're left with a situation with a situation—what's the Fed going to do … to keep the economy buoyant," he said. "Right now I don't see any plans in place to do that."

Read MoreFed taper to cause 'severe recession': Economist

By CNBC's Michelle Fox.

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