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Phil LeBeau

CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM."

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • Four months into President Obama's administration and three months after he created the Auto Task Force to find a solution for an imploding auto industry, people are mad at the President.

  • Chrysler Bankruptcy Greases Path For GM Friday, 22 May 2009 | 10:34 AM ET
    GM Headquarters

    Within two weeks expect to see GM in bankruptcy. And when the company files, whether it's late next week or Monday June 1st, the road map for a quick creation of a newer, leaner GM will be laid out for the Federal Government to follow. It's the Chrysler bankruptcy which has gone about as smoothly as the auto task force was hoping.

  • Who Should Determine What Fuels Our Cars/Trucks? Thursday, 21 May 2009 | 9:50 AM ET

    How do you define "free market". Yesterday, I argued the "free market" should determine if cars and trucks are powered by diesel fuel or by the conventional gasoline most vehicles currently use. This baffled some of you.

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