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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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    Tomorrow Discovery launches Planet Green, replacing its home network with the first 24/7 network dedicated to environmentally-friendly programming. The new buzz word is "eco-tainment" and the company that gave us the highly-rated "Planet Earth" series is betting it'll be in high demand.

  • Fire at Universal Studios

    The movie studio and its adjacent theme park owned by CNBC's parent, NBC Universal suffered a terrible fire Sunday morning, closing the theme park on a crowded Sunday, and for much of the day shutting down Citywalk, which is where I'm writing from right now (CNBC's LA bureau sits perched above the open-air mall area).

  • Weather Channel Logo

    Though the Weather Channel's owner, Landmark Communications, was originally looking for $5 billion for the asset, which includes mobile and online, now the bids are coming in at some $3.5 billion in stock and debt. Bankers telling me that the number has come down with the turmoil in the credit markets.

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