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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Oscar Ceremony Not So Golden With Ratings Monday, 25 Feb 2008 | 4:24 PM ET
    Oscars not so golden

    The preliminary ratings numbers are out and Nielsen Media Research is saying that ratings for the Academy Awards telecast last night were some 14 percent lower than the least-watched ceremony ever, which was 2003, when 33 million people watched. And these preliminary ratings are also 21 percent lower than last year.

  • The Oscars

    The 80th Annual Academy Awards brought the glamour and champagne back to Hollywood after a grim 100-day strike. John Stewart cracked the requisite jokes about the work stoppage -- calling the Oscars the "makeup sex" for the industry.

  • Unsung Oscar Heroes: PriceWaterhouse Coopers Friday, 22 Feb 2008 | 3:14 PM ET
    Hollywood

    You'd think the Academy Awards were controlled by studio moguls or movie stars. But the guys really holding the cards -- literally -- are a couple of accountants. Forget about George Clooney and Will Smith -- without Price Waterhouse Coopers, the show couldn't happen.

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