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Julia Boorstin

CNBC Media and Entertainment Reporter

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

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  • Writers' Strike: "Starring" John Edwards Monday, 19 Nov 2007 | 8:34 AM ET

    I'm writing this (Friday) from the NBC studio in Burbank and the strikers are out in full force, thrilled that they have a big star visiting--presidential candidate John Edwards. This place is a zoo. It's like the crush of the cameras outside the Oscars but without the red carpet and the organization. (He could have passed for a movie star, a number of writers crushed around me were commenting on his good looks.)

  • If you're braving the airports this holiday season it's a good idea to do some research. So, here are a couple of my favorite sites for traveling. I like this site AvoidDelays.com. It can be kind of depressing, but it's useful. The site says that on November 14 (this past Wednesday), some 2,011 flights were delayed. Ugh!

  • Facebook introduced a new ad platform last week, and since then dissent in the media has been slowly growing. After all the buzz about the hot Internet 2.0 company, it remains to be seen if Facebook will fall flat when it actually comes to delivering promised ad revenue.

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