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Video: Analysis of Buffett's Annual Letter

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Without a doubt America's most successful investor, Warren Buffett, released his much anticipated annual letter to his shareholders yesterday reporting a net worth gain in 2006 of $16.9 billion, an 18.4% increase.

With Berkshire Hathaway sitting on $42 billion in cash, shareholders and investors alike pour over his missive every year, searching for guidance on where and how Buffett finds value.

Buffet has a knack for finding the overlooked gems -- company's like Israel's Iscar and South Korea's POSCO are among his more recent bets. Along with POSCO, Buffett added four other new companies to his master list: Conoco Philips , Johnson & Johnson , Tesco and U.S. Bancorp .

In the first two videos, Liz Claman -- who had an one-of-a-kind interview with Buffett in Omaha last year -- provides an overview of Buffett's letter and a look at his search for an "emotionally stable" understudy.

The final video in our series examines how Berkshire Hathaway soared 56%, driven by improved insurance results and what the Oracle of Omaha calls a "large dose of luck." Joe Lampel, Professor of Strategy, Cass Business School, shares his insights with Michelle Caruso-Cabrera on "Worldwide Exchange."

Buffett's Message
Fri. Mar. 2 2007 | 8:17:00 AM [04:26]

The Oracle Has Spoken
Fri. Mar. 2 2007 | 7:00:00 AM [02:01]

The Buffett Letter
Fri. Mar. 2 2007 | 6:40:00 AM [03:26]

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