GO
Loading...

Mark Cuban to CNBC: Whole Foods CEO Displays 'Digital Narcissism'

CNBC.com
Thursday, 12 Jul 2007 | 1:18 PM ET
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban reacts as his team plays the Phoenix Suns in Game 3 of their NBA Western Conference finals basketball game Sunday, May 28, 2006, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
Chris Carlson
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban reacts as his team plays the Phoenix Suns in Game 3 of their NBA Western Conference finals basketball game Sunday, May 28, 2006, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

CNBC asked billionaire dotcom entrepreneur Mark Cuban, owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks and author of his own blog, to comment on the revelation that Whole Foods CEO John Mackay had anonymously posted comments about his company and its arch-rival on a Yahoo message board. This is how he responded:

I haven't read a ton, just a few articles on the subject. But I can tell you that I feel bad for Mackey. When you eat, sleep and breathe a company, it's hard to disconnect from all the emotions involved. When I was President of Broadcast.com (in pre-FD 1998,9), I used to post as myself on Yahoo message boards all the time. Why? Because it was a great outlet to discuss the company. Some guys want to argue Bonds vs. Aaron, but it's more fun for an entrepreneur to discuss WFMI vs. the critics.

Unfortunately for Mackey, there isn't that opportunity anymore. I don't know all the regulations these days, but as the CEO he should have found a better way to release that energy.

It's a blunder in respect to the grief he is going to have to deal with, and the impact it could have on the acquisition. But for shareholders, it's an indication that Mackey lives his company and it's not just a job for him. This is just part of the downside of someone so passionate and in love with his company.

I call it digital narcissism.

Featured

Contact U.S. News

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    › Learn More

Don't Miss

U.S. Video

  • Bitcoin. Digital gold rush or a shadowy tool empowering criminals on the dark web? What is really driving The Bitcoin Uprising? CNBC's Mary Thompson takes an in-depth look at this emerging digital currency by speaking to the bitcoin faithful, who believe the open source currency will upend the global financial system, as well as those who believe bitcoin is an easily manipulated tool that empowers criminals, hackers and drug barons in the dark online underworld. Although the future of bitcoin is uncertain, The Bitcoin Uprising sheds much needed light on the speculative currency and the future of money.

  • Loyalists around the world have embraced it as the cryptocurrency of the future, but some big names on the street differ widely in their beliefs about bitcoin. The Oracle of Omaha thinks it's a "joke." Tech entrepreneur Marc Andreessen counters that Buffett is out of touch, while bitcoin believers like Jonathan Rumion fully embrace the digital currency by buying groceries with bitcoin and even getting paid in bitcoin. CNBC's Mary Thompson reports.

  • Authorities say the online black-market bazaar Silk Road could be the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the criminal underworld using bitcoin for trading in illicit goods and services. On the "Dark Web," fake IDs, drugs, even hit men are all paid in bitcoin. CNBC's Mary Thompson explores why bitcoin is the currency of choice for criminal activity on the dark web and reports on the story of Mt. Gox, the largest bitcoin exchange, which shut down in February, leaving bitcoin investors holding the bag.