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Michael Yoshikami

Michael Yoshikami
Founder & CEO, Destination Wealth Management

Michael Yoshikami, Ph.D., CFP®, is CEO and Founder of Destination Wealth Management and Chairman of DWM's Portfolio Strategy Committee.

Founded in 1986, Destination is a San Francisco Bay Area-based independent firm that provides fee-based wealth management services to institutional and individual investors. Michael was named by Barron's as one of the "Top 100 Independent Financial Advisors" six years in a row (2009 – 2014).

Michael has over 30 years of experience in the investment management and financial planning field. He oversees the economic viewpoints of the firm and the integration into client portfolios. As Chairman of the Portfolio Strategy Committee, he oversees the macro tactical asset allocation weightings for client portfolios. Additionally, he works with Destination's investment team in integrating behavioral investing strategies with the firm's core fundamental perspective.

Michael provides commentary to Reuters, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, and other international publications and publishes a weekly investment market/investing report that examines the macro environment and its impact on investment decisions.

He holds a Ph.D. in education, and has earned the Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) designation.


More

  • Yoshikami: The World According to Volcker Wednesday, 3 Feb 2010 | 8:52 AM ET
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    For investors, the resulting legislation and regulation could change the landscape for expected returns going forward.

  • More Spending =  Gigantic 2010 Budget Monday, 1 Feb 2010 | 3:02 AM ET

    The 2010 budget is here and it's one for the record books. Media reports forecast that the nation's budget deficit will hit $1.6 trillion in fiscal 2010, a fresh record and the biggest since World War Two.

  • Higher Rates? Here's How To Invest Thursday, 7 Jan 2010 | 11:13 PM ET

    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Sunday cracked the door open a bit more to the idea of raising interest rates to pop potential bubbles, reinforcing the view that rates are set to go up before 2010 bows out.