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'Long Island Lolita' Amy Fisher Starts Porn Company

Amy Fisher, who has been called many things in her life, is about to add another title – porn magnate.

The woman perhaps best known as the “Long Island Lolita” has launched an adult film production company—and will produce and star in adult films for Dreamzone Entertainment starting later this year. The company, Amy Fisher Productions, initially plans four films to be released before the end of 2011.

“Our society loves sex,” said Fisher in a statement. “Sex is beautiful, powerful, and simply put, no one has the right to tell me what I can or can not do with my own private parts.”

Fisher, now the mother of three, has been a long-time presence in tabloids. She earned the “Long Island Lolita” nickname in 1992, when at the age of 17 she shot and severely wounded Mary Jo Buttafuoco, the wife of her lover. After spending seven years in prison following a guilty plea to first-degree aggravated assault, she took a job as a columnist for the Long Island Press.

Her introduction to the porn world was, initially, a seemingly involuntary one. After she married in 2003, her husband sold a sex video of the couple to a porn company two years ago. Fisher sued the distributor, claiming copyright infringement and other damages, but eventually settled the case.

Curiosity drove sales, with the video eventually selling over 200,000 copies, according to Fisher’s publicist. That seemed to spur Fisher’s curiosity in the adult industry. She has since moved into a career as a nude dancer and made a pay-per-view adult film of her own.

The adult entertainment industry has been struggling in recent years, besieged by Internet piracy and the recession. While it used to be virtually recession-proof, free porn has become so readily available online that people who would have bought an adult DVD five years ago are now spending that money on other things (like sex toys).

There are two areas in the adult film industry that have managed to thrive, though: Parody and celebrity. Porn parodies are red-hot, with Vivid’s “Batman XXX” (a spoof of the 60s TV show) having the right combination of camp and kink to catch the eye of buyers. The film’s two trailers garnered over 1 million views on YouTube and the DVD has topped sales charts for nearly two months.

America’s celebrity and tabloid obsession, though, has kept the sex acts of the rich and famous as hot sellers. Porn giant Vivid Entertainment is the reigning king of this subgenre, releasing sex films starring “Girls Next Door” star Kendra Wilkinson, country singer Mindy McCready and alleged Tiger Woods mistress Joslyn James over the past year.

Fisher’s role as both producer and star is somewhat rare in the porn industry, which is largely male dominated. Generally, women who run their own companies are industry veterans, who have established a loyal following of fans and have a little leverage with porn houses.

Dreamzone Entertainment is a small player in the adult industry, however. Its biggest title to date was a parody of the ABC sitcom “Roseanne”. By signing with a smaller company, Fisher was likely better able to sign on her own terms – likely getting a bigger royalty on sales as well.

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