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Remington Under Fire

About the Show

The Remington Model 700-series rifle — with more than five million sold — is one of the world’s most popular firearms. Famous for its accuracy, the rifle is now the target of a series of lawsuits alleging that it is unsafe and susceptible to firing without pulling the trigger. Remington insists its rifle is safe, trusted, and reliable, though a trail of death and serious injury dating back decades has prompted critics to ask whether this iconic American company has compromised safety in the name of profits, and gone too far in trying to protect its signature product. Senior Correspondent Scott Cohn’s report is the result of a 10-month CNBC investigation.

Video Excerpts

  • Remington Under Fire: A CNBC Investigation  Friday, 15 Oct 2010 | 12:00 AM ET

    CNBC's 10-month investigation stretched from Florida to Alaska, turning up thousands of complaints, two dozen deaths, more than 100 injuries and 75-plus lawsuits, all alleging the gun fired without the trigger being pulled.

  • Even experienced shooters have problems  Thursday, 4 Dec 2014 | 8:00 AM ET

    Remington has consistently stated the deaths and injuries involving its bolt-action 700 series rifles were the result of poor maintenance or unsafe handling ... except it's not just inexperienced users who say it's happened.

  • An unimaginable tragedy  Thursday, 4 Dec 2014 | 8:00 AM ET

    We found Gus Barber laying right here, wadded up in a little ball. Gus was only this thick. It went in through his left hand, entered here, and the bullet exited four inches higher on the opposite side.

  • Remington knew about trigger fixes  Thursday, 4 Dec 2014 | 8:00 AM ET

    In 1948, before the gun went on sale, Mike Walker proposed a design alternative, laid out in this memo, a safety that would lock the trigger in place, preventing it from falling out of alignment and allowing the gun to go off.

  • Remington made aware of design flaw  Thursday, 4 Dec 2014 | 8:00 AM ET

    Mike Walker knew about complaints surrounding the 700. In fact, his own memos obtained by CNBC show he repeatedly raised concerns about the gun he designed.

  • Remington's internal trigger memos  Thursday, 4 Dec 2014 | 8:00 AM ET

    Those documents clearly speak for themselves, says Rich Barber. And they speak volumes about what the company knew, when they knew it, what they did and what they did not do ... and what they continue to do today.

Related Articles

  • Remington Model 700 rifle

    The manufacturer of the most popular hunting rifle in the world has been aware of potential safety problems with the gun since before it went on the market—60 years ago.  Newly uncovered documents, including memos and drawings by the gun’s inventor, show company officials discussing the potential problem, as well as whether a design change is worth “the high expenditure required to make the conversion.”

  • Inside Remington Rifle's Controversial Trigger Tuesday, 19 Oct 2010 | 1:55 PM ET
    Remington Model 700P

    At the heart of the decades-long controversy over the Remington 700 series is a piece of metal that is roughly the length of a paper clip.

  • Why Guns Can Only Be Recalled by Manufacturer Tuesday, 19 Oct 2010 | 3:48 PM ET
    Remington Model 700.

    Internal company documents show that at least twice, the Remington Arms Company considered a nationwide recall of its popular 700 series rifles, but decided against it despite thousands of complaints and dozens of lawsuits over inadvertent discharges.

  • Remington Model 700 rifle

    The manufacturer of the world’s most popular hunting rifle has been wrestling for decades with questions about whether the gun is safe, and at least twice considered a nationwide recall of the gun, according corporate insiders and internal documents revealed in a ten-month CNBC investigation.

Remington Documents

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  • Scott Cohn develops in-depth features, special reports and documentaries for CNBC and CNBC.com.