GO
Loading...

What Do NCAA Financial Statements Show Us?

Last night, Deadspin posted what it said was five years of NCAA financials that had been mistakenly posted on its Web site. That's not exactly true, the files can easily be obtained from the membership side of its Web site, which the NCAA says 30,000 people have access to.

"These files are not password-protected, nor have we made any attempt to make them so in recent days," said NCAA spokesman Erik Christianson.

Still, it got us to take a look at the documents.

Here are the highlights:

  • The NCAA does distribute more than 92 percent of its total annual take to its member institutions after factoring in the costs to put on the championships.
  • The NCAA finished 2008 with $356 million in investments. Factoring in inflation, that's up 45.9 percent from 2003-2008.
  • The NCAA finished 2008 with $469 million in total assets. Factoring in inflation, that's a 52% increase from 2003-2008.
  • The NCAA paid $56.25 million, which it has to pay out over nine years, for the rights to the NIT.

Here is what the NCAA makes off March Madness:

  • 2005: $420 million
  • 2006: $453 million
  • 2007: $490 million
  • 2008: $529 million
  • 2009: $571 million
  • 2010: $617 million
  • 2011: $657 million
  • 2012: $710 million
  • 2013: $764 million

Here is what the NCAA makes off the women's tournament:

  • 2005: $12 million
  • 2006: $13 million
  • 2007: $13.8 million
  • 2008: $14.8 million
  • 2009: $15.8 million
  • 2010: $16.8 million
  • 2011: $17.9 million
  • 2012: $18.8 million
  • 2013: $19.1 million

So essentially, the NCAA makes more money in 1 1/2 men's games than they make for the entire women's tournament each year.

Questions? Comments? SportsBiz@cnbc.com