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Economic Measures Inflation

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    If you are one of the many investors having trouble stomaching the big and wild swings, now may be a good time to scale back on your level of risk.

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    If you have a strong stomach and like a good gamble, the current volatility may be a good opportunity to put some money in play to beef up your portfolio gains in what's been a rocky year. While the pickings may seem slim, investment strategists say there are some opportunities within certain sectors, and if you are considering making broader bets, using options strategies can provide a good way to maximize gains while limiting losses.

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    Financial planners say the end of the year marks the perfect opportunity to revisit your asset allocation to ensure it still reflects your financial goals and tolerance for risk -- especially with many economists projecting the bear market will continue for the next six months.

  • The storm hitting Wall Street ramped up to category 5, and it's not over. Wednesday's markets illustrated in every way the fears investors have been living with since the credit crises began a year ago.

  • The unprecedented government rescue of insurance giant AIG calms the market's angst, but the question is whether credit markets will cooperate with the Fed and what other shoes are there left to drop.

  • The Federal Reserve, meeting during an unprecendented crisis on Wall Street, decided to leave interest rates unchanged but expressed concern about the crisis escalating.

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    Stocks rallied at the close after the Federal Reserve held the line on interest rates and investors were encouraged that Lehman Brothers and American International Group might work out deals to improve their perilous financial situation.

  • The Federal Reserve left rates unchanged on Tuesday, giving little relief for Wall Street one day after the Dow's 500 drop. What follows are video highlights of the experts' reactions.

  • Financial markets are widely expecting the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates today, but they may not get their wish.

  • U.S. stock index futures dropped as fears mounted over the capital position of American International Group.

  • Financial markets are widely expecting the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates today, but they may not get their wish. Take our Poll:

  • The Consumer Price Index had its first drop in nearly two years.  Here is a breakdown of the inflation benchmark to show you where costs are rising most.

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    Don't expect the central bank to cut interest rates on Tuesday at its regularly scheduled FMOC meeting following the Lehman Brothers-Merrill Lynch-AIG developments, even though that's the action it took in March when Bear Stearns was on the ropes.

  • The already roiled markets have a new fear: the survival of AIG.

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    Attention Wall Street: Add the precipitous slowdown in consumer spending to the list of worries and reasons to think a recession is underway or imminent. 

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The Fed may start considering  another interest rate cut at the end of this year or early 2009, which was widely considered out of the question a week ago.

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    Some 21 percent of those with salaries of $100,000 or more say they are living paycheck to paycheck, according to a recent survey conducted by CareerBuilder.com. So, if you're counting the days to your next payday, here are some tips to break out of the paycheck-to-paycheck syndrome.

  • The end result of the global economic slowdown may be the U.S. announcing national bankruptcy as the government cannot afford the bailouts that it promised and the market will not bail out the government, Martin Hennecke, senior manager of private clients at Tyche, told CNBC on Thursday.

  • Global financial leaders convened at an economic summit held at the University of Virginia to discuss the world's economic concerns. The conference tried to design a blueprint for how to solve some shared economic problems, such as the subprime mortgage crisis and rising fuel and food costs.

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    Despite a Fannie-Freddie takeover, a $168-billion stimulus measure, a housing rescue package and Fed rate cuts, the economy is still struggling.  Now what?