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Economic Measures Inflation

  • Stocks opened lower Tuesday after a report showed retail sales unexpectedly dropped — and dropped sharply — in March. But Citigroup, Bank of America and General Motors advanced.

  • The Singaporean dollar gained against its American counterpart Tuesday after the country's central bank announced it was effectively devaluing its currency after posting its worst quarterly economic contraction ever. Experts tell CNBC the gain is unlikely to last.

  • Stock futures retreated Tuesday after a report showed retail sales unexpectedly dropped -- and dropped sharply in March.

  • Street crowd

    The US economy is not out of the woods yet, but the worst of the downturn will probably pass this year, as various components of the stimulus thrown at it will start to show results, White House adviser Christina Romer told CNBC Tuesday.

  • President Barack Obama will tap Fannie Mae Chief Executive Herb Allison to head the government's $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program, an administration official told CNBC.

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    All the government borrowing programs aimed at increasing liquidity have some economists worried that there could be a steep price to pay down the road.

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    Most people say they plan to use this year's tax refund to pay bills, deciding in this sour economy to be more frugal with their annual windfall.

  • Abby Joseph Cohen

    The US stock market appears to have hit bottom and the nation's economy might see an upward shift in the latter half of the year, widely watched investment strategist Abby Joseph Cohen told CNBC

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    The once-booming CEE is stealing the limelight again but this time for less palatable reasons. As one analyst put it, "Eastern Europe's problem is a greater weight on the Western European nations than the subprime is in the United States."

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    You've heard all the gloom and doom. Now here's some good news: the economic recovery could happen much sooner—and be much stronger—than anyone thought possible.

  • Global stocks rose Thursday, ahead of the long Easter weekend, as governments and central banks take concerted efforts to restore economic growth.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Below are the minutes released by the Federal Open Market Committee after its Mar. 17-18 meeting:

  • Although oil prices should remain low for the next three to six months, the threat of surging prices remains, according to John Hofmeister, former Shell president and CEO of U.S. operations.

  • Gold Bars

    Global stocks fell Wednesday, tracking Wall Street's overnight slide, as poor earnings from Alcoa sparked concerns about other corporates. Experts tell CNBC that despite the volatility, there are still "amazing" opportunities out there.

  • Global stocks eked out small gains Tuesday ahead of the start of the U.S. corporate earnings season, which aluminum producer Alcoa kicks off later. Experts expects the first-quarter earnings to be a doozy for most American companies.

  • The global economy has crashed and so has the price of oil. The same countries that used billions from crude exports to subsidize gasoline at home, even as prices hit record highs elsewhere in the world, are now under tremendous strain.

  • Optimists looking for fresh signs of a recessionary bottom will have to wait until next week to find out if  the worst is over.

  • The government is extending the deadline for private fund managers to apply to participate in the administration's program to purchase distressed assets from banks.

  • Global stocks and the euro gained Monday as hopes that the economic downturn is nearing its bottom spurred demand for riskier assets. Experts tell CNBC they see long-term value in the euro and gold, while they see short-term value in the dollar and stocks.

  • While most Asian markets closed higher Friday on the back of the G20 summit optimism and a rally in tech stocks, European markets were lower ahead of the March U.S. jobs report. Economists polled by Reuters expect a decline of 650,000 jobs.