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Capital Markets Investment Banking and Brokerage

  • The Fed said it rejected Citi's capital plan over worries about how it would fare in a financial crisis, but not everyone is sure that's the only reason.

  • Citigroup is still "too big to fail" now that the Fed rejected its dividend and stock buyback plan, CNBC's Jim Cramer says.

  • UBS investment chief pay tops CEO pay

    UBS's highest paid executive was investment banking chief Andrea Orcel, who earned 11.43 million Swiss francs in 2013, surpassing the CEO and chairman of the bank.

  • Kenneth Moelis

    Moelis, an investment bank formed by former UBS bankers, filed with US regulators on to raise up to $100 million in an initial public offering.

  • The five chief executives running Wall Street's largest banks will rake in just 3 percent of what their peers at private equity firms stand to make from 2013.

  • It's investor day at JPM

    CNBC's Kayla Tausche provides a preview of what investors can expect to hear from JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon at today's event.

  • The culture of Wall Street

    CNBC's Kayla Tausche goes inside the world of investment banking and the struggles of Wall Street to retain top level talent. CNBC's David Faber provides insight.

  • Lloyd Blankfein attends the 2014 WEF in Davos, Switzerland.

    The Goldman Sachs CEO also says the U.S. economy won't exceed the high side of expectations because the bar has been risen.

  • Morgan Stanley's 'core' strategy for new Wall Street

    Wall Street is in its biggest transition since the Great Depression, says James Gorman, Chairman & CEO of Morgan Stanley, sharing perspective on the capital markets and his company's growth strategy. The creditworthiness of the company is back, but the results aren't there yet, says Gorman.

  • LOYAL3: IPOs for the small investor

    Barry Schneider, Chairman & CEO of LOYAL3, discusses how his online brokerage firm aims to make investing easier.

  • Goldman and Citigroup by the numbers

    The core revenues bounce back, says Marty Mosby, Guggenheim Partners analyst, breaking down the big banks' quarterly earnings.

  • Larry Fink, CEO of BlackRock Investments.

    The long-discussed "Great Rotation" won't be from bonds to stocks but will be within the bond market, BlackRock Chairman and CEO Larry Fink told CNBC.

  • Investment products need greater scrutiny: Fink

    Larry Fink, Chairman & CEO of BlackRock, discusses ways to protect investors while managing risk and regulating asset management. We need to look at regulating more at the product level, says Fink.

  • What worries Larry Fink? Technology gutting jobs

    Larry Fink, Chairman & CEO of BlackRock, discusses where he thinks interest rates are likely headed. Inflation is going to hold down rates, says Fink. And a discussion on how technology is aggressively transforming the global workforce.

  • BlackRock's CEO: Great rotation will be in bonds

    Larry Fink, Chairman & CEO of BlackRock, shares his thoughts on investment banking and what he is seeing as a shift away from core index bonds into "unconstrained' fixed income.

  • Marijuana plants seized in Aubrey Price arrest

    Federal law currently prohibits banks from processing marijuana transactions, but that may all be about to change.

  • Dick Bove

    Government regulations aimed at reducing reducing risk at the nation's banks in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis are having the opposition effect, bank analyst Dick Bove tells CNBC.

  • Merrill Lynch marks 100th anniversary

    Winthrop H. Smith, Sugarbush Resort president, discusses the history of Merrill Lynch and the real story of what happened to the brokerage firm as it marks its centennial anniversary. No one challenged the culture of fear that had grown there, says Smith.

  • They’re called momentum stocks on Wall Street. Cramer says they can make you a lot of money, but only if you know when to get out.

  • Moelis: M&A on long, slow & steady improvement

    Moelis & Co. founder and CEO Ken Moelis, discusses the current M&A environment, as well as regulatory conditions. He says regulations "will continue to pressure people who want to have one-on-one relationships with their client undisturbed by some of the oversight that's meant for balance sheets."