Funny Business with Jane Wells

Jane Wells

Jane Wells
Special Correspondent, CNBC

Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com. Based in Los Angeles, she also contributes to CNBC's breaking news coverage.

Wells assumed her current role after more than 20 years as a CNBC reporter. Most recently, she covered retail, agriculture and defense as well as reports on California's economy, West Coast real estate and Las Vegas for the network. Wells joined CNBC in 1996, providing special coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil case for "Rivera Live." During her career at the network, Wells also served as a senior correspondent for CNBC's "Upfront Tonight."

Prior to joining CNBC, she was a correspondent for the Fox News Channel and Los Angeles reporter for NBC's flagship television station, WNBC, in New York. Her television news career includes reporter positions with KTTV, Los Angeles; WTVJ, Miami; and KOB, Albuquerque. She has also contributed international reports for CNN.

Wells has received numerous honors for her work, including a 1992 Peabody Award and duPont Award for her role in the live coverage of the Rodney King Trial. That same year, she earned a Los Angeles Emmy Award for her investigative reporting. She also has received UPI, Press Club and Emmy Awards for feature reporting; three Florida Emmy Awards for news reporting; and the Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for team reporting.

Wells holds bachelor's degrees in broadcast journalism and philosophy from the University of Southern California, where she graduated with honors. She and her husband have two children and live in Los Angeles.

Follow Jane Wells on Twitter @janewells.

More

  • Lindsay Lohan's booking photo.

    In what may be one of the more obscure tie-ins to the Lohan saga, the Insurance Information Network of California ran some numbers on what it might cost Lohan to legally drive in California.

  • Cows waiting to be milked

    The funny, far-reaching business of regulatory reform. "I don't think anybody has read it," says cowboy Brett Crosby of the 2,300-page FinReg bill. "War and peace is only 1,400 pages, for crying out loud, and people don't even read that."

  • airport_security_200.jpg

    Flying Pasties is a new product which promises to let you "keep your dignity" at the airport. A $20 set of stickers will cover your privates from prying eyes as you walk through full body scanners.

  • Apple iPhone 4

    A web site called Antenn-Aid is selling band-aids to cover the spot on the new iPhone 4 from Apple susceptible to a weakened signal if the phone comes into contact with human skin. "Apple made a boo-boo. Make it all better," is the sales pitch. Buy a six-pack for $4.99 plus shipping.

  • nobama_clock_200.jpg

    "President Obama has failed his promises, he has failed his responsibilities, he has jeopardized our future! It's time we start counting down this disastrous presidency," says one man with an eye on the elections and another eye on opportunity.

  • Sex Degrees of Separation: The Ultimate Guide to Celebrity Relationships

    Hollywood celebrities change partners more often than Congress changed Finreg. Keeping up with the Kardashians, and everyone else, requires years of painstaking research. Irad Eyal is on the job.

  • Rush Limbaugh

    Limbaugh launched a passionate defense of Apple and its iPhone 4 on his syndicated radio program Thursday, saying he "had no reception problems" with the one he recently purchased.

  • Mel Gibson

    Looks like Mel Gibson is starring in "Lethal Weapon 5: The Mouth that Roared". Gibson's career was already on the ropes after his drunken, anti-Semitic rant during a DUI arrest in 2006. It appears, however, that he is an equal opportunity bigot. Can his career be saved?

  • The new Sprint HTC Evo 4G smartphone is displayed at the International CTIA Wireless 2010 convention at the Las Vegas Convention Center March 24, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. CTIA is the international association for the wireless telecommunications industry.

    The funny business of cell phones signals. Consumer Reports says you may need a little duct tape on your iPhone 4 to guard against dropped calls. Sound like a step backward? What about a cellphone signal that may fail in the middle of a large building?

  • Trojan Fire & Ice condoms

    Trojan is sponsoring an exhibit on the history of condoms at the Museum of Sex. Yes, there is such a museum, in New York City. The exhibit is called "RUBBERS: the Life, History & Struggle of the Condom", and it details the history of prophylactics from the early days to now.

More From Funny Business with Jane Wells

  • Jane Wells

    Based in Los Angeles, Jane Wells develops features, special reports and series for CNBC and CNBC.com.

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