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Asia Top News and Analysis Japan

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    Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso on Friday announced a new stimulus package to shore up his country's economy, with measures to spur employment, encourage lending and inject capital into financial markets.

  • Global markets were wobbly Thursday, hurt by uncertainty over a $14 billion rescue plan for U.S. automakers. In the midst of the increased market volatility, experts interviewed by CNBC advise investors to stay cautious and diversified to survive the bear market.

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    Hopes that governments worldwide will aid ailing industries and implement stimulus measures to fight against a deepening economic crisis lifted Asian stocks Wednesday. Experts tell CNBC an end is near for the economic gloom.

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    Monday's market rally was short-lived with Asian stocks making humble gains while European stocks fell Tuesday. In the midst of the market volatility, experts tell investors to tread carefully around the rallies but that there are some signs of a market bottom.

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    Global stocks started the week in the green, with the Hang Seng index closing over 8 percent higher, on investors' optimism over a possible U.S. automakers bailout. CNBC's experts deem this rally to be a big one and for investors to get off the sidelines and get back into stocks.

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    Global markets were mixed Friday ahead of the November nonfarm payrolls data out in the U.S. Crude fell almost 7 percent overnight as market volatility persisted. Analysts interviewed by CNBC give their views on where to invest.

  • This was an extraordinary day in the world of interest rates even in these extraordinary times.  Central banks around the world have aggressively cut interest rates and the United States is planning on a mortgage rate cut cram down.

  • Despite the unexpected drawback in U.S. crude inventories, oil prices continued their fall Thursday, to below $46 a barrel, near four-year lows, as economic fears deepened. As the downturn persists, analysts interviewed by CNBC suggest oil could fall to $20 a barrel.

  • As markets continued their volatile trade Wednesday, low-risk assets like U.S. Treasuries retained their luster, despite offering the lowest yields in decades. Betting on credit may offer better returns than stocks, some analysts say.

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    The Big Three will become two, Detroit will need more help from the government, SUVs will enjoy a modest rebound and electric cars will fire up the industry.

  • Without question, the Fed is pleased with the outcome of their actions in reducing a housing market interest rate and will be emboldened to do more in this aspect.

  • The bottoming process has begun in stock markets and now is the time to buy good value US, Chinese and energy stocks, experts tell CNBC.

  • The yen is set to slip versus the dollar and euro throughout the week as the recent upswing in stock-market sentiment eases investors' fear, Max Knudsen, director of PIA - First.com, told CNBC.

  • As markets continue to shoot up and then just as quickly tumble, investors should dig deep and find affordable value, Wouter Weijand, chief investment officer of high income equity at Fortis Investments, said Friday.

  • Has all the volatility in this market left you with indigestion? Maybe there’s relief ahead and we’re not talking antacid tablets.

  • Don’t heed the hype. This weekend’s G20 Summit will not, and cannot live up the hopes that a new financial architecture will be unveiled. It will likely be little more than a photo opportunity for the political class to demonstrate to their people that they are doing some about the global crisis.

  • While the government focuses on recapitalizing banks, the Treasury Department shouldn't forget about its initial plan to find prices for toxic assets held by banks, Stephen Roach, chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia, told CNBC Wednesday.

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    Evidence of a weakening Chinese economy and feeble data from Australia and Britain reinforced fears of a prolonged global recession on Tuesday, as policymakers groped for a co-ordinated response to the downturn.

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    Japan's current account surplus in September plunged 48.8 percent from a year earlier as import growth far outpaced export growth in the face of a global slowdown, the Finance Ministry said Tuesday.

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    China pitched in nearly $600 billion to the global effort to avoid the worst economic downturn in decades, while grim Japanese data offered more proof of the damage caused by the global financial crisis.