Media

Julia Boorstin

Julia Boorstin
CNBC Senior Media & Entertainment Correspondent

Julia Boorstin joined CNBC in May 2006 as a general assignment reporter. Later that year, she became CNBC's media and entertainment reporter working from CNBC's Los Angeles Bureau. Boorstin covers media with a special focus on the intersection of media and technology. In addition, she reported a documentary on the future of television for the network, "Stay Tuned…The Future of TV."

Boorstin joined CNBC from Fortune magazine where she was a business writer and reporter since 2000, covering a wide range of stories on everything from media companies to retail to business trends. During that time, she was also a contributor to "Street Life," a live market wrap-up segment on CNN Headline News.

In 2003, 2004 and 2006, The Journalist and Financial Reporting newsletter named Boorstin to the "TJFR 30 under 30" list of the most promising business journalists under 30 years old. She has also worked for the State Department's delegation to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and for Vice President Gore's domestic policy office.

She graduated with honors from Princeton University with a B.A. in history. She was also an editor of The Daily Princetonian.

Follow Julia Boorstin on Twitter @jboorstin.

More

  • Oscar Awards

    The Oscars are the second-biggest TV event of the year (after the Super Bowl), but this year they're truly a multi-screen event. This year the Oscars are going high tech, a push to get a bigger, younger audience.

  • oscar_statue_150.jpg

    We're set up on the red carpet, which is actually on Hollywood Blvd. And with the threat of rain, the red carpet is covered in white plastic and the giant gold statuettes are covered in giant clear plastic bags.

  • Togetherville

    Today it announced that it's buying 'Togetherville' a social network for kids 10 and under. Togetherville is as squeaky clean as its name implies — it's designed to avoid all the bad stuff that open adult social networks bring, with careful monitoring of content, and parental supervision controls.

  • movie_theater_200.jpg

    Last year was the biggest year for the global box office — EVER — if you're looking at total money spent. But in the US, the number of people attending movies is on the decline.

  • Amazon.com

    After months of rumors and speculation Amazon s launching its long-anticipated instant video streaming service — a direct competitor to Netflix.

  • Steven Spielberg

    Steven Spielberg, may be the biggest name of Hollywood, but he's been keeping a low profile at the box office, which is all about to change.

  • Just Dance 2 Wii

    It's no surprise that video game sales continue to fall — off 5 percent in January. And as expected Activision Blizzard's "Call of Duty: Black Ops" topped the list. The big surprise is the fact that dance games are thriving, with three dance games in the list of the top ten bestsellers.

  • Cinderella's Castle

    Iger kicked off the day with the key themes that are dominating the day's presentations: the value of brands and franchises, embracing technology, and growing in the US and abroad.

  • Oscar Awards

    There's no question, live events are in demand. There's plenty of speculation why, including bad weather this winter. But there's also plenty of talk about the "Twitter Effect."

  • Leslie Moonves

    CEO Les Moonves said in the earnings call that the scatter market —when marketers buy ads at the last minute—was "extremely hot in the fourth quarter and continues to be up even hotter," now up 40 percent over the upfront ad period.

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