Business Mexico

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    How much do you know about the bottled-water industry? Take our quiz and find out.

  • Mexican central bank chief and IMF candidate Agustin Carstens

    Agustin Carstens, who heads Mexico's central bank, is pushing to replace Dominque Strauss-Kahn as head of the IMF.

  • Carstens: Mexico's IMF Candidate

    Many believe that Agustin Carstens is more qualified to run the IMF than French Finance Minister Christine LaGarde. In an interview with CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, Carstens discusses why he's the best candidate for the job.

  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF) headquarters building is seen in Washington, DC.

    Agustin Carstens, the underdog candidate to head the International Monetary Fund, has accused European governments of trying to pre-empt the fund’s succession process and failing to tackle their own debt problems, reported the FT.

  • Brewer Grupo Modelo has kept a lid on the price of hops and barley for the first half of the year but that could be changing just in time for barbeque season.

  • Summer is the time when the most Americans travel abroad. Some visit family and friends; others simply sightsee. Our neighbors Mexico and Canada are by far the most popular. The U.K. is a distinct third, while Germany, Italy and France are fairly close together in occupying spots 4-6. In all, the government tracks visitors to the top 38. Some travelers like to go to more exotic and far - flung destinations, very few of which make it onto that list. There's another travel list kept by the governm

    Summer is the time when the most Americans travel abroad. But US travelers should be aware of the State Department's list of countries carrying a travel warning. Learn more.

  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF) headquarters building is seen in Washington, DC.

    The IMF, or International Monetary Fund, is an intergovernmental agency that works to keep exchange rates and the international system of payments stable.

  • Carlos Slim

    In the two decades that Carlos Slim Helú has turned a crumbling Mexican phone monopoly into a continental telecom giant, he has successfully fought off competitors and challenged authorities who wanted to limit his companies’ control. But over the last few weeks, a series of developments is threatening to chip away at Mr. Slim’s dominance. The New York Times reports.

  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Higher interest rates in Latin America are luring bond investors.

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    The yen is higher as investors sell riskier assets, and Mexico is going for the gold. Time for your Cinco de Mayo FX Fix.

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    Mexico has quietly purchased nearly 100 tons of gold bullion, as central banks embark on their biggest bullion buying spree in 40 years, the FT reports.

  • BP sign

    BP will resume drilling in the Gulf of Mexico as early as July, less than 15 months after an accident that killed 11 workers and led to the worst offshore oil disaster in US waters, the Financial Times reports.

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    The U.S. jobs report made plenty of traders happy - but dollar traders were left in the dust. Here's how to use currencies to trade on the news. Hint: go across the border.

  • Japan is Hawaii's second largest market for tourists behind the US mainland. Last year, 1.2 million Japanese came to the islands and spent $1.9 billion, according to the state tourism officials.  Now, all of this is threatened.

  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) unmanned aerial vehicle of the CBP Air and Marine Unmanned Aircraft System.

    The Mexican government said Wednesday it has allowed U.S. drones to fly over its territory to gather intelligence on drug traffickers.

  • Unrest in the Middle East has put investors on high alert as crude oil prices move seemingly with every development in the region. In order to understand the effect of those events on both US and global oil markets, a key figure to watch is the amount of crude oil produced daily in each country. With data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), a division of the Department of Energy, CNBC.com took a look at the countries that produce the most crude oil on a daily basis. Production is d

    With data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), a division of the Department of Energy, CNBC.com took a look at the countries that produce the most crude oil on a daily basis.

  • An international oil tanker passes through the Suez canal in Ismailia, Egypt.

    Oil could hit $220 a barrel if "Libya and Algeria were to halt oil production together," analysts at Nomura investment bank predicted.

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    Retiring in another country used to be a foreign concept to most Americans but it’s becoming more common thanks to two main factors: the Internet and the economy.  "All you have to do is think outside the border," one expat said.

  • Christ the Redeemer statue, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    After decades of boom to bust behavior, economies  from Mexico to Brazil are looking dynamic, diverse and  durable, helped by a wealth of natural resources and a good measure of fiscal discipline.

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    To deal with that dangerous climate in Mexico, the demand for bullet-proof clothing has risen. And well-off Mexicans, including many corporate executives, are shelling out cash to have brand-new vehicles retrofitted with bullet-proof materials that can ward off the spray from assault rifles.