Business Middle East

  • Protestors stand with a soldier as he waves an Egyptian flag on an army tank in Tahrir Square on January 29, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

    I wrote earlier about the difficulty in predicting the future structure and alliances of the Egyptian military. And of the fundamental unknowability of weather.

  • Investors facing a global economy that is moving back and forth between "risk on" and "risk off" should look to emerging markets and commodities, Nouriel Roubini, chairman of Roubini Global Economics, told CNBC Thursday.

  • Protestors chant as they ride on an army tank transporter in Tahrir Square on January 29, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Tens of thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets across Egypt in Cairo, Suez, and Alexandria to call for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. Riot police and the Army have been sent into the streets to quell the protests, which so far have claimed 32 lives and left more than a thousand injured.

    As violence has broken out in Egypt, concern has turned to the risk of the blocking of the Suez Canal or nearby pipelines, which could pose a threat to world energy supplies, the New York Times reports.

  • International investor Jim Rogers

    More social and political turmoil is likely in the future so commodities prices will continue rising, renowned investor Jim Rogers, CEO of Rogers Holdings, told CNBC.

  • Jean-Claude Trichet

    Like a warning curl of smoke, inflation talk is working its way through financial markets.

  • The exchange-traded fund that aims to track the Egyptian stock market is on fire again today.

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    In retrospect, Tuesday’s big rally in the stock market wasn’t hard to figure out. The market did what it almost always does the first day of the month.

  • Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    As the situation on the ground in Egypt continues to destabilize—with riots breaking out in Tahrir Square earlier this afternoon Cairo time—there is much discussion of the critical role the military will play in Egypt in the days and weeks to come. Among policy analysts who seem to agree on little else, there appears to be a consensus on this: The military will play a key role in determining the future of the Egyptian nation.

  • Egyptian demonstrators demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, gather around the national television building guarded by members of the Presidential guard in Cairo on January 28, 2011.

    A little over nine years ago, one of the biggest stories in international affairs was Thomas E. Ricks’ Page One story in the Washington Post a briefing given to a Pentagon advisory group that characterized the Saudi ruling family as enemies of the United States.

  • A combo of pictures shows Egyptian demonstrators tearing a huge portrait of President Hosni Mubarak during a protest against his rule in the northern port city of Alexandria on January 27, 2011.

    Steve Sailer points out why our aid to Egypt doesn’t seem to buy us as much loyalty as it once might have.

  • Thousands of Egyptians gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

    Some pensioners are able to withdraw money from ATMs in Egypt, but the stock exchange will remain closed until "calm is restored to the street," newly-appointed Egypt Finance Minister Samir Radwan told CNBC Wednesday.

  • A youth with an Egyptian flag painted on his face stands in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt.

    With the Middle East in the background, financial markets are turning their attention to Friday's jobs report and other U.S. economic data slated for this week.

  • President Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama told Hosni Mubarak on Tuesday an orderly transition of power in Egypt "must begin now" in remarks critical of the Egyptian leader's plan to stay in office six more months.

  • Thousands of demonstrators gather near a huge banner reading 'leave' in Arabic at Cairo's Tahrir Square as massive tides of protesters flooded Cairo for the biggest outpouring of anger yet in their relentless drive to oust President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

    Decades of autocratic government and a lack of free elections are, of course, the main drivers of the political upheaval in Egypt. But did the sinking dollar and skyrocketing food prices trigger the massive unrest now occurring in Egypt — or the greater Arab world for that matter?

  • Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak

    If President Hosni Mubarak says in a speech tonight that he will step down at the next election, as Al Arabiya TV is reporting, I doubt it will do much to satisfy the protesters. If anything, it will likely embolden them.

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    In his new book, "THE NEXT DECADE: Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going," Friedman predicts that, above all, America's power will be tested, and while the author says it will endure, it will require what he calls, "extraordinary skill of the decade’s Presidents to navigate turbulent waters and balance relationships."

  • IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn

    Youth unemployment in Egypt and Tunisia was a ticking "time bomb", IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn told CNBC Tuesday, adding that he had warned of such a situation developing back in the summer.

  • Protestors hold an anti-President Hosni Mubarek sign in Tahrir Square during afternoon anti-government protests in central Cairo, Egypt.

    Tuesday's "million" person march in Egypt could keep the heat on oil prices, which have gushed nearly 8 percent in two sessions.

  • Protestors chant as they ride on an army tank transporter in Tahrir Square on January 29, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Tens of thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets across Egypt in Cairo, Suez, and Alexandria to call for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. Riot police and the Army have been sent into the streets to quell the protests, which so far have claimed 32 lives and left more than a thousand injured.

    Companies with operations in Egypt are doing their best to maintain business as usual, with varying results.

  • The "Mad Money" host's four steps to prospering amidst negative news stories.