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  • A man undergoes a screening test for possible nuclear radiation at screening center about 35 kilometers away from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    Stone tablets in Japan, some more than six centuries old, are inscribed with messages about tsunamis, the New York  Times reports.

  • Bank of Japan Governor Masaaki Shirakawa said on Saturday that the country's economic outlook was very severe and that the central bank would take appropriate action to support the economy.

  • No Japan Blame Game

    CNBC's Herb Greenberg with details on the supply chain impact after Japan's earthquake and tsunami.

  • Tornado Impact

    CNBC's Jane Wells reporting on the human and economic toll, following the deadliest outbreak of tornadoes in decades.

  • People take shelter at an evacuation centre in Natori, Miyagi prefecture on March 16, 2011.

    A month after the tsunami ripped apart the north-east coast of Japan, 36 families from Rikuzentakata have become the first to shift their few possessions into temporary housing, a move that marks a new beginning but also reinforces anxieties about what lies ahead. The FT reports.

  • A rescue worker stands atop rubble during a body recovery mission March 20, 2011 in Ofunato, Japan. More than a week after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, the death toll has risen to over 8,000 with thousands more still missing. Presently the country is struggling to contain a potential nuclear meltdown after a nuclear plant was seriously damaged by the quake.

    In the wake of the devastating March 11 earthquake, Japan faces one of its greatest ever clear-up jobs. The deadly tsunami that followed the quake turned whole towns along the northeastern coast into tangles of steel, wood, concrete and silt that must be removed before true recovery can begin. The FT reports.

  • Rescue workers check the remains of a tsunami devestated house

    Stone tablets in Japan, some more than six centuries old, are inscribed with messages about tsunamis, the New York  Times reports.

  • Woman lies on the beach as workers clean up tar balls on the Gulf Islands National Seashore, Pensacola Beach, Florida.

    The relief fund for victims of last year's Gulf oil spill is working efficiently but shouldn't be used as a template for future disasters, Ken Feinberg, administrator of the fund, told CNBC.

  • Hurricane

    More than 90 tornadoes — described by one meteorologist as a “family” of them — hit the state of North Carolina on Saturday, causing widespread damage, reports the New York Times.

  • And here's how market pros recommend cashing in on the rising inflation trade.

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    Euro traders wonder how far eurozone debt problems will spread, and everyone worries about Japan's nuclear catastrophe — it's time for your Terrible Tuesday FX Fix.

  • Here's what you should be watching Tuesday, April 12.

  • Markets React to Japan Earthquake

    The market falls 100 points and recovers after news of Japan being hit by a 7.4 magnitude earthquake, with CNBC's Tyler Mathisen & Scott Wapner. And CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the quake's impact on the oil markets. Gordon Charlop, Rosenblatt Securities, and Warren Myers, Warren Meyers, DME Securities, and CNBC's Rick Santelli discuss the rebound.

  • December 21, 2012 -- the end date in the ancient Mayan calendar. Will it bring the Apocalypse? See some of the most notorious prophets and doomsday groups in history.

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    "When a natural disaster strikes, its victims most urgently need aid. Many companies respond by making direct donations and matching employee gifts. But in times of crisis, we advise companies to do more than give money," writes this author.

  • TEPCO workers in protective suits conduct a cooling operation by spraying water at the damaged No. 4 unitP at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex.

    Engineers pinned their hopes on chemicals, sawdust and shredded newspaper to stop highly radioactive water pouring into the ocean from Japan's tsunami-ravaged nuclear plant Sunday as officials said it will take several months to bring the crisis under control, the first time they have provided a timetable.

  • A pedestrian road has collapsed in the massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake in Urayasu city, Chiba prefecture. The earthquake shook Japan, unleashing powerful tsunamis that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    There seems to be little news to merit any optimism. The challenges facing Japan are great and daunting. But let's not discount the resilience and determination of the Japanese and let's not dismiss the Japanese economy.

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    What a start to the year. Revolution across North Africa and war in Libya, $100 oil, renewed crisis in the euro zone and an environmental and nuclear disaster in Japan all tested investors' nerves in the first quarter of 2011; but despite this wall of worry, the Dow finished the quarter up over 6 percent.

  • These plays might be "glaringly obvious," but Cramer said they're making investors a lot of money.

  • General unrest in the Middle East has had a "dramatic impact on oil prices," the chief executive of a major South African mining and energy company said Thursday—and he makes no secret of the fact that that's good news for his firm.