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  • These plays might be "glaringly obvious," but Cramer said they're making investors a lot of money.

  • General unrest in the Middle East has had a "dramatic impact on oil prices," the chief executive of a major South African mining and energy company said Thursday—and he makes no secret of the fact that that's good news for his firm.

  • HSBC

    HSBC is cutting growth targets and raising inflation forecasts following dramatic rises in commodity prices that threaten the global recovery.

  • Jefferies analyst Peter Misek weighs in on how the natural disasters in Japan may affect Apple's production.

  • Setbacks mounted Wednesday in the crisis over Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear facility, with nearby seawater testing at its highest radiation levels yet and the president of the plant operator checking into a hospital with hypertension.

  • International investor Jim Rogers

    Japan's nuclear disaster is going to increase demand for natural gas and oil for a while and oil prices will rise but the world cannot do without nuclear energy yet, investor Jim Rogers told CNBC Wednesday.

  • China

    The world's biggest economies are recovering from the Great Recession at troublesome speeds: too fast or too slow.

  • Perhaps we were wrong to cite the CBOE's VIX contract as a good indicator of market volatility? Recent events, including on-going military action in Libya and the Portugal sovereign debt crisis, would have suggested that the market should sell off on greater uncertainty, and yet the VIX fell from 29 last week to 17 today. Are investors becoming more sanguine about these issues?

  • Here's what you should be watching Thursday, March 30.

  • Question Marks

    The current market environment reminds me of the movie “Wayne’s world” that I saw longer ago than I care to remember. The party mood on the markets just continues in the face of clear and present dangers.

  • Mercedes

    Supply disruptions related to the earthquake and related crisis in Japan haven't affected Mercedes-Benz yet, but could down the road, warned Ernst Lieb, the automaker's U.S. CEO, in an interview with CNBC.

  • singapore_1_200.jpg

    The reality is, in this century, a global perspective is necessary when investing for portfolio success. Latin America, developing Europe, the Middle East, and Africa all hold promise. And without a doubt the brightest beacon for emerging growth today is Asia.

  • It's a rough day for the British pound, but the sun is shining down under — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • stock_quotes.jpg

    Standard & Poor’s issued a warning on Thursday to big banks itching to increase their dividends: proceed with caution, the New York Times reports.

  • Japanese 10,000 Yen bank notes

    The yen may regain its status as a carry trade of choice now that the G7 has intervened to halt its rise. Is another rush into global assets coming?

  • Texas Instruments

    Texas Instruments still expects a company manufacturing facility in Japan to be back into full operation by September or earlier despite the massive earthquake and tsunami that struck the country, Rich Templeton, CEO of the company, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Futaba, Fukushima

    A CNBC analysis of how markets reacted to previous nuclear accidents may help explain and predict the impact of the emergency in Japan.

  • Damaged houses, cars and debris after the earthquake

    Talk about a morning with wildly inconsistent messages about the auto industry's ability to build vehicles in the wake of the Japan earthquake and tsunami.

  • Troubles in Portugal and Spain aren't keeping the euro down, but anemic retail sales are doing a number on the British pound — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Despite record inflows into the Japanese ETF, options traders are less than optimistic about a Japanese recovery.