Biotech and Pharmaceuticals Pharmaceuticals

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  • Investors are eager to hear results from Amylin and Biogen, Thursday. It seems the future of both firms could lie in the hands of Fast Money friend Carl Icahn!

  • The Dow advanced Wednesday, boosted by an encouraging "beige-book" report from the Federal Reserve, a better-than-expected manufacturing report from the New York Fed and as Procter & Gamble raised its dividend. Techs remained underwater as Intel's lack of guidance rattled the sector.

  • Stocks opened lower Wednesday as Intel's after-hours earnings report the day before dragged down tech stocks and a warning from Wal-Mart hit the broader indexes.

  • Twitter

    In my less than five weeks on Twitter, I've gotten ideas for four blogs and late yesterday, for the first time, I got a legit news tip off a tweet (for the uninitiated, that's what the short messages sent on Twitter are called.)

  • Stock futures indicated a mixed open Wednesday as Intel's after-hours earnings report the day before dragged down tech stocks.

  • Oh, the fun the late-night comics could have with this one. The makers of the little blue pill are a little red-faced on the Emerald Isle.

  • dendreon_logo_new2.jpg

    Dendreon is up yet again today on heavy volume. Several investors have emailed me and one analyst voicemailed me asking if I know what's going on. I don't. And I see no news.

  • Victory for vernakalant! No, that's not German. It's the scientific, generic name of the experimental heart rhythm maintenance drug at a little Canadian company called Cardiome. The announcement came out Wednesday evening that Merck is hooking up with CRME in yet another partnership deal between big pharma and baby biotech.

  • lilly_hq.jpg

    Drug names are a favorite topic of mine. So, can someone please explain why the proposed commercial name for Eli Lilly's new bloodthinner in the U.S. is "Effient" with two f's, but in the UK, where the pill is making its debut today, it's going by "Efient" with only one f?

  • continental_airlines.jpg

    The emails flew over my post yesterday about the big pharma slides I saw on a flight last week.

  • Pills

    I don't want to get anyone in trouble, so I won't name the company, the drug or even what it's for. (Note to corporate PR folks reading this: Don't even try to pry it out of me. My lips are sealed.) All I'll say is that it's one of the biggies.

  • dendreon_logo_new2.jpg

    I'm not really enjoying my "day off" so far here in rather gloomy, cool L.A. as I've been kept pretty busy trying to chase down the Dendreon story.

  • Cubist Pharmaceuticals is up more than 12 percent today with heavy options activity amid rumors that the company will be bought by Swiss drug giant Novartis.

  • Generic drug company Forest Labs is seeing heavy call activity amid buyout rumors.

  • Pills

    An estimated 20 million or so Americans have the disease, which many experts call an epidemic. It costs this country tens of billions of dollars a year to deal with it. And several biopharma and monitoring device companies are racing to grab a bigger piece of this fast-growing, sugar-free pie.

  • Breakthrough diabetes treatments may be on the horizon. What companies stand to win?

  • A prestigious peer-reviewed journal is proposing taking a hardline stance on what it calls the "pervasive" funding relationship between drug and medical device companies and professional medical associations.

  • Shares of Amylin Pharmaceuticals are rallying on a press release from AMLN and its partners Eli Lilly and Alkermes that their once-a-week version of the injectable diabetes drug Byetta (buy-ate-uh) lowered blood sugar levels more than the pills Januvia from Merck and Actos from Takeda.

  • A drug from Novartis has won U.S. approval as a treatment for patients with kidney cancer that has returned after treatment with older drugs.

  • arena_pharm.jpg

    There is no quid pro quo in my line of work. At least there shouldn't be. But when you do two stories on CNBC and another one on "TODAY" that mentions a company's drug and profiles a patient who appears to have been a "responder" in one of its clinical trials you expect a certain basic professional level of cooperation and assistance.