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Legislation Regulations

  • Capitol Hill Agenda

    Reform of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reforms might be a good starting place for the Republicans who formally took control of the House of Representatives today.

  • Facebook

    Facebook’s practice of raising capital on private markets largely out of the direct oversight of regulators has spurred an inquiry by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • congress.jpg

    Companies spend millions of dollars each year complaining to Congress about burdensome laws and regulations, pressing their concerns in public campaigns and in private meetings. They rarely wait for invitations. The New York Times reports.

  • lisbon portugal

    January in the northern hemisphere is usually the coldest month of the year and it might prove to be a bitter one for euro zone governments trying to raise money in the capital markets, reports the Financial Times.

  • Pope Benedict XVI

    The Vatican planned to issue new rules Thursday designed to make its financial transactions more transparent after a money laundering probe resulted in the seizure of 23 million euros ($30.21 million) from a Vatican account.

  • New York Stock Exchange

    ICE Trust, the world’s largest clearinghouse for credit-default swaps, cited “significant changes” to proposed regulations in deciding to withdraw its application, the New York Times reports.

  • European Central Bank

    Eurozone end-of-year financial market tensions have been highlighted by the European Central Bank’s failure to reabsorb funds it has spent on buying government bonds to combat the region’s debt crisis, reports the Financial Times.

  • European Central Bank

    The European Central Bank increased its intervention in government bond markets last week, indicating that the euro’s monetary guardian remained wary of an escalation of the eurozone debt crisis, reports the Financial Times.

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    It’s eye opening to reflect that the Basel III requirements are the joint production of than 500 representatives from 27 nations, including top regulators and central bankers. They met dozens of times this past year. They produced 440 pages of new rules.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    As the Federal Reserve debates whether to scale back, continue or expand its $600 billion effort to nurse the economic recovery, four men will have a newly prominent role in influencing the central bank’s path, the New York Times reports.

  • Julian Assange

    Julian Assange has signed book deals worth more than £1 million ($1.5 million) in the US and UK, to allow the WikiLeaks founder to cover his legal fees and maintain the whistleblowing site, reports the Financial Times.

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    With Democrats achieving their major victories in Congress by party-line votes, the next session could see more partisan animosity.  The New York Times reports.

  • House for sale

    You'd think that with barely a week left in 2010 we'd have a better idea of where we're headed in 2011, but a new round of data seem to have the experts more conflicted than ever.

  • student_loan3_200.jpg

    Call it one of the dirty little secrets of the education industry: When students can’t pay their loans, many schools manage (some would say, manipulate) default rates so they look better than they really are.

  • Julian Assange

    the New York Times reports.

  • business_fail_200.jpg

    Fresh details have emerged of secret talks between bank auditors and the government during the financial crisis, as regulators prepare changes to the auditor’s role to lessen the risk of similar chaos. The FT reports.

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    The world’s biggest investment banks are to overhaul their pay structures to differentiate between bankers based in Europe and those who work elsewhere, the FT reports.

  • Home with foreclosure sign

    When North Carolina banking commissioner Joseph Smith's nomination to head the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) passed out of committee early last week, I thought it was a done deal. Not so much anymore. While his credentials seemed fit for the job, and his support widespread throughout the industry, his timing may be his downfall.

  • Robert Khuzami

    Although it was the Department of Justice and the FBI that took the lead on four insider-trading arrests Thursday, the Securities and Exchange Commission is also conducting its own inquiries, the commission's director of enforcement said Friday.