Legislation Regulations

  • winners_losers_2009_140_generic2.jpg

    We asked you to vote on the big winners and losers of 2009.  In the results of our poll—100,000 votes were cast—there were a few close votes, some decidedly one-sided ones and a couple surprise outcomes. And, there were a handful of big losers and big winners.

  • Stuff your emergency fund with cash

    How much do you know about your credit cards? Take Suze Ormon's quiz and find out.

  • Carbon Emissions

    US corporations have long been bracing for the day they would have to make sharp cuts in their emissions. That day moved closer when President Obama outlined a target for such reductions, the New York Times reports

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    The Transportation Department imposed its first penalties for runway delays Tuesday, collecting $175,000 from three airlines for leaving 47 passengers of a regional jet stranded overnight in Rochester, Minn.

  • Carbon Emissions

    California has taken a major step toward creating a broad-based trading system to limit emissions of pollutants blamed for harmful climate change.

  • Federal Reserve

    A congressional plan to audit the Federal Reserve's decision-making process poses a serious threat to the economy, former Fed governor Frederic Mishkin said.

  • Bernard Madoff

    Bernard Madoff's bankruptcy trustee and the law firm employing him submitted a $22.1 million legal bill covering five months of work.  Baker & Hostetler LLP is seeking $21.28 million of fees as counsel to court-appointed trustee Irving Picard for the five months ended Sept.

  • Financial Crisis

    The coroner’s report left no doubt as to the cause of death: toxic loans. That was the conclusion of a financial autopsy that federal officials performed on Haven Trust Bank, a small bank in Duluth, Ga., that collapsed last December, the New York Times reported.

  • Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, in testimony before the Joint Economic Committee Thursday, will argue that "recovery alone is not enough" and that Congress must pass comprehensive regulatory reform to ensure the strength and stability of the economy, according to an excerpt of the speech obtained by CNBC.

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    A group of House Democrats are stepping up demands for greater transparency from the Federal Reserve after reports that the Fed mishandled the bailout of insurance giant American International Group.

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    Government regulators will break up institutions whose failure would bring down the entire financial system, under an amendment Rep. Paul Kanjorski will introduce today.

  • Bank of America

    A senior House Democrat says the government didn't force Bank of America to take over Merrill Lynch, but a bank board member said much pressure was applied and Republicans charged that a committee inquiry was covering up the role of an Obama administration official.

  • microscope_200.jpg

    The most important new antidiscrimination law in two decades — the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act — will take effect in the nation’s workplaces next weekend, prohibiting employers from requesting genetic testing or considering someone’s genetic background in hiring, firing or promotions. The New York Times explaines the ramifications.

  • Convicted Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff may have loved the high seas as much as he loved deceiving clients of his firm, Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities. Madoff owned not one, not two, but three boats, including a luxurious 56-foot yacht named "Bull."

    Convicted Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff loved the high seas. All his boats were sold at auction by National Liquidators on behalf of the U.S. Marshal's Service. Click to see the images.

  • google_logo_blue.jpg

    Google and book publishers are expected to show a federal judge in New York a new settlement in the copyright lawsuit over Google's book-scanning project.

  • capitol_building_wallstreet_1.jpg

    No bank should be too big to fail, according to JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, who includes his own institution on the list.

  • AIG Headquarters

    In a memo to the company's employees, AIG CEO Robert Benmosche said Wednesday that he and the board remain "totally committed" to leading AIG.

  • Sen. Christopher Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, told CNBC Wednesday that his version of the financial reform bill is a "discussion draft," and there is still room for debate over whether to create a single federal regulator, as well as whether to make an independent consumer protection agency.

  • Gavel

    A weird thing is happening right now, and it borders on the dangerous. Companies want to merge, and partner, and collaborate, and they have lots of cash on the balance sheet, ready to do deals that may help jumpstart their businesses, light a fire under sluggish markets, increase efficiencies, and generate nice returns for their investors. Yet federal agencies in this country and abroad aren't merely getting more active when it comes to scrutinizing the deals, they're getting activist.

  • In some cases, the difference between a winner and loser is often in the eye of the beholder--who can be a victim or a beneficiary--or simply a political ideologue. That’s why we want readers to weigh in and vote on a variety of people and concepts. We’ll report back with results and rankings on December 1.