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Legislation Regulations

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  • United States Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson listens to a question following his speech at the Confederation of British Industries annual conference, in London, Tuesday Nov. 28, 2006. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson will host a conference in Washington Tuesday looking at how regulation is affecting U.S. capital markets' competitiveness. The the day-long forum will include some of the biggest names in business, including Warren Buffett, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, NYSE CEO John Thain and General Electric chairman Jeffrey Immelt (GE owns CNBC).

  • Buffett, Greenspan Differ on Regulation of U.S. Markets Wednesday, 14 Mar 2007 | 9:17 AM ET

    Warren Buffett and Alan Greenspan offered sharply different views on government regulation of U.S. capital markets, reflecting the divisions among many business and government leaders who gathered in Washington for a high-level conference on U.S. competitiveness.

  • Wall Street money managers told a House committee that hedge funds should disclose more to their bankers and improve their risk management but not be subject to mandatory registration, CNBC’s Melissa Lee reported from Capitol Hill.

  • Wall Street may be losing its competitive edge to foreign markets because of increased government regulation, according to some business groups and legal experts.

  • Wall Street is losing its competitive edge to foreign markets because of an increasingly tough regulatory environment, legal experts told CNBC's "Power Lunch."

  • Oxley: Don't Blame SarBox For IPO Drop Friday, 9 Mar 2007 | 2:56 PM ET

    A Republican who backs marketplace regulations might seem paradoxical -- but Michael Oxley, ex-GOP representative, co-authored the sweeping 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Does the former chairman of the House Financial Services Committee still approve of "SarBox"? He gave his views, on "Power Lunch."

  • A bill that would give shareholders the right to cast non-binding votes on executive pay sparked sharp comments Thursday at a subcommittee hearing in Washington.

  • Register Hedge Funds? Experts Debate Dangers Thursday, 8 Mar 2007 | 1:46 PM ET

    There oughta be a law, says Sen. Charles "Chuck" Grassley (R-Iowa), that requires hedge funds to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Would the so-called Grassley Amendment produce healthy accountability -- or stifle investment? Ex-SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt and a Wharton professor debated the question on "Morning Call."

  • 'Say On Pay' Bill Discussed In Congressional Committee Thursday, 8 Mar 2007 | 12:44 PM ET
    everglades_KeoTheYounger.jpg

    Congress is considering a bill that would give shareholders the right to cast non-binding votes on executive pay and "golden parachutes" if the enterprise is sold. Opponents say the measure, HR 1257, would force CEOs to devote more time to meeting with advocacy groups and less time on planning and product development. Supporters say that unless pay is tied to performance, executives have incentive to cook the books.

  • SEC Halts Trading in 35 Penny Stocks Over Spam E-Mails Thursday, 8 Mar 2007 | 12:37 PM ET

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suspended trading today in the stocks of 35 small companies linked to spam e-mail campaigns urging small investors to buy shares.

  • XM-Sirius Merger: Will It Be A Hit On Anyone's Dial? Wednesday, 7 Mar 2007 | 3:01 PM ET

    This afternoon-- Sirius Satellite Radio CEO Mel Karmazin will be on Capitol Hill pushing for a merger with rival XM. Should the government approve the proposed merger between Sirius and XM or would it kill any competition? Skeptics say it is unlikely to benefit consumers or investors but the biggest obstacle will be antitrust regulations.

  • Collectors Warned: Beware The Wine Con Tuesday, 6 Mar 2007 | 4:47 PM ET

    Counterfeiting money and knocking off handbags are familiar crimes; now, the latest scam is faking rare wines. Ray Isle, senior editor at Food & Wine magazine, joined "Street Signs" to talk about the threat to the high-end market.

  • Boards of Directors Coming From New Talent Pool Tuesday, 6 Mar 2007 | 9:35 AM ET

    The composition of the board of directors at major companies is changing and becoming less clubby. On "Squawk Box" CNBC's Mary Thompson says there’s no shortage of candidates to serve on corporate boards, but they’re now drawn from a different talent pool. In 2001, about half board members were active CEOs. Last year, the figure declined to 29%.

  • NYSE Requests SEC Relief From Upcoming Regulations Friday, 2 Mar 2007 | 2:14 PM ET

    NYSE Group has requested the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission grant it relief from securities regulations that would oblige the New York Stock Exchange to route orders to certain markets, according to a public filing.

  • Furor Rages As Investors Pay Executive Taxes Monday, 26 Feb 2007 | 11:41 AM ET

    Death and taxes are the two universal fates, right? Well, the latter may not hold true for certain executives, whose tax bills are footed by shareholders. On "Morning Call," two compensation experts debated the appropriateness of such supposed free rides.

  • The Real Winner On The TXU Deal Monday, 26 Feb 2007 | 10:30 AM ET

    Look below the surface of the $45b takeout of TXU and what do you see? A long list of concessions to help the deal sail through. But to find who really wins from these concessions, look a little deeper.

  • The President's Working Group (PWG) on Financial Markets has not pushed for new hedge fund regulations -- except for a rule that would raise the minimum net worth of investors to $2.5 million from $1 million. Even some PWG critics agreed with the suggested floor -- but Magnum Funds' David Friedland decried the "discrimination." The debate raged, on "Morning Call."

  • The President's Working Group put forward a set of guidelines they said would enhance information about the largely secretive investment pools.

  • Passenger "Rights" -- Or Govt. Gone Wild? Viewers Speak Wednesday, 21 Feb 2007 | 1:39 PM ET

    Some in the U.S. Congress are discussing a so-called Passenger "Bill of Rights," which would legally bind airlines when their craft are delayed. Is this a good idea? Or merely an example of unnecessary and potentially stifling regulation? Read what some viewers had to say.

  • Neeleman Speaks -- Again -- On Righting JetBlue Wrongs Tuesday, 20 Feb 2007 | 11:54 AM ET
    David Neelemen

    History shows that outraged citizens tend to drive reforms -- fast. It's no different with publicly traded companies -- like JetBlue Airways. David Neeleman, CEO of the beleaguered carrier, returned to CNBC to explain how his "Bill of Rights" may prevent last week's nightmare from recurring.