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  • David Cameron

    Britain’s new prime minister, David Cameron, will have to contend with the demands of his own Conservative Party as well as those of his Liberal Democratic partners, the New York Times reports.

  • Plus, the Mad Money host reacts to rising gold prices.

  • The UK election just got a lot more interesting in a big negative way for the British pound.

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    The pound is not yet significantly reacting to the coalition talks, but this may change if negotiations go on long enough.

  • A man arrives at a polling station at St Johns Parish Church, London.

    Even with rioters on the streets of Athens and the 16 countries using the euro threatened with mounting turmoil, the economy remained the most frequently — and least candidly — discussed topic in the UK as the three main parties entered the last hours of a monthlong general election campaign.

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    Almost a fifth of voters switched allegiances as a result of the televised leaders' debates, according to a poll. That could set up the UK for a hung parliament.

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    With government deficits in Britain second in Europe only to those in Greece, whoever wins Thursday’s general election will be forced to make deep and unpopular cuts, the New York Times reports.

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    Simon Cowell, the man who made millions from being the front man of American Idol and the X-Factor, has intervened in the UK election race just 24 hours before Britain goes to the polls.

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    With two days to go before the UK election analysts at Bank of New York Mellon have found that David Cameron's opposition Conservative Party is ever more likely to form a majority government, albeit with a very small majority.

  • Euro bills and coins in cash register tray

    Greece announced Sunday a long-delayed rescue package that will require years of painful fiscal belt-tightening, but the deal probably will not defuse the potential threats to other European countries, The New York Times reports.

  • Euro bills and coins in cash register tray

    Greece announced Sunday a long-delayed rescue package that will require years of painful fiscal belt-tightening, but the deal probably will not defuse the potential threats to other European countries, The New York Times reports.

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    The third and final TV debate between PM candidates is over but none of the three spoke about the hidden issue that will define the UK economy over the long term.

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    Investors in UK bonds and securities are preparing to navigate unfamiliar territory, with the likelihood that the May 6 national election will not result in a clear winner.

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    The worst outcome for the UK election – a hung parliament – has already been priced in, and some analysts forecast the pound could appreciate by up to 15 percent after the May 6 vote.

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    In one of the most stunning turnarounds in British election history, the UK's third party, the Liberal Democrats, now lead opinion polls just two and a half weeks before we go to the vote.

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    Speculators have begun to zero in on another small member of Europe’s troubled monetary zone, the New York Times reported, highlighting the same economic flaw that brought Greece to the verge of insolvency.

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    With airports on lock-down due to the massive cloud of soot thrown up by an Icelandic volcano, Britain this morning woke up to headlines hailing Nick Clegg, the leader of the UK’s third party the Liberal Democrats, as the winner of the first US-style TV debate in history.

  • British Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

    UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown told British voters Wednesday night that he was sorry for not imposing stiffer regulations on the City of London and banking industry in the UK when he was Chancellor of the Exchequer.

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    With opinion polls so tight, the three US-style TV debates, which will happen every Thursday until the UK goes to the polls, will be important. Whether they will be a game changer is open to question though.

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    David Cameron is struggling to convince a group of his own party election candidates of the merits of key Conservative policies.