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Europe Top News and Analysis United Kingdom

  • Engineer testing natural gas pipeline.

    Pro trader Jim Iuorio explains why the cold temperatures might push nat gas higher.

  • The high-rise Bakrie Tower, which houses the headquarters of Bumi Resources, owned by the Bakrie family in Jakarta

    London-listed coal miner Bumi said an independent probe had not been able to prove misuse of funds at its Indonesian units, as documentary evidence had been obtained illegally and key witnesses had refused to cooperate.

  • Rio Tinto to Axe Costs, Cautiously Optimistic on China Growth

    Mining firms including BHP Billiton and Anglo American are likely to follow Rio Tinto's lead in writing down underperforming assets by as much as $10 billion, as low prices and rising costs eat into valuations.

  • U.K. banks and other finance firms will shed another 18,000 jobs in the first quarter of 2013 after cutting 25,000 in the last quarter, according to a report by a business lobby group.

  • Algerian security forces escort a bus carrying freed hostages outside a police station in In Amenas in the desert in Algeria's deep south on January 19, 2013.

    Algerian special forces have found the bodies of two Canadian Islamist fighters after a bloody siege at a desert gas plant, a security source said on Monday, as the death toll reached at least 80 after troops stormed the complex to end the hostage crisis.

  • Gloomy economic indicators have plagued the U.K. and put the government's austerity plan at risk. The country's triple-A rating remains on the brink, with ratings agencies Standard and Poor's and Fitch both having negative outlooks on its sovereign debt. But analysts say the real picture for the U.K. economy could be even worse.

  • David Cameron

    Prime Minister David Cameron is leading Britain into a minefield in seeking to renegotiate its terms of membership of the European Union. His gamble could easily end in a bust.

  • This is a satellite image of the Amenas, Algeria. Islamist militants held dozens of foreign hostages and hundreds of Algerian workers hostage in a gas field located approximately 45 km from the city.

    The Algerian army carried out a dramatic final assault to end a siege by Islamic militants at a desert gas plant on Saturday, killing 11 al Qaeda-linked gunmen after they took the lives of seven more foreign hostages.

  • Islamists protest in Algiers on Friday against the decision by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to allow French fighter jets to use Algerian airspace.

    An American and a Frenchman have been found dead, and the Obama administration said Friday it was trying to secure the release of U.S. hostages still being held by Islamic militants at an Algerian gas plant deep in the Sahara.

  • Pound Sterling Symbol

    The U.K. pound has come under increasing pressure in the last few weeks as the outlook for growth in the country looks sluggish, but the currency could fall even more as the economy faces multiple problems.

  • UK Retail: Who had a Christmas Cracker?

    Richard Perks, director of retail research at Mintel International, tells CNBC who won and who lost in the Christmas trading.

  • London House Prices Raised by Asian Buyers

    Grainne Gilmore, head of UK residential research at Knight Frank, attributes the five percent rise in London house prices in 2012 to overseas Asian buyers.

  • Fish and chips, London.

    The EU without Britain would be like "fish without chips", the prime minister of Finland said on Wednesday as he made a case for Britain remaining an influential player in Europe.

  • A customer carries Tesco-branded shopping bags as she leaves one of the company's stores.

    British supermarket chain Tesco has withdrawn a number of beef burgers from sale after samples were found to contain horse DNA in tests.

  • European Union Confronts the Risk of a 'Brixit'

    Ken Clarke has stepped up the pro-European rhetoric as the battle over Britain's future in the EU intensifies, warning that a referendum on the issue is a "gamble" and that David Cameron may be about to open the door accidentally to a British exit, the Financial Times reports.

  • Goldman Sachs backed down on Tuesday on its plan to delay paying U.K. bonuses in order to benefit from an imminent cut in the top personal tax rate.

  • Battersea power station and nearby residential flats.

    One of the most recognizable buildings in London has seen substantial interest from buyers, as its latest developers try to create an 8 billion pounds ($12.9 billion) “new town center” south of the Thames.

  • European Union (EU) flags fly outside the the European Commission headquarters in Brussels.

    There will be no chance of a financial transactions tax, a short-selling ban, or any other business-unfriendly measure being implemented here if the U.K. is not in the EU. That is a strong reason to suspect that the City would thrive outside of the EU, Professor Moorad Choudhry writes.

  • Antony Jenkins, chief executive officer of Barclays PLC.

    Barclays and Deutsche Bank will take a knife to bonuses for investment bankers as they seek to tackle high costs, people familiar with the matter said.

  • JP Morgan sign

    JPMorgan Chase may release on Wednesday additional results of internal probes into its $6.2 billion "London Whale" trading loss that could lead to a lower bonus for CEO Jamie Dimon, according to published reports.