Closing The Gap

Women's coworking space The Wing will now offer childcare

544489663

The millennial pink coworking space for women, The Wing, announced this week that it will launch an on-site children's space called "The Little Wing" this winter in its Soho and West Hollywood locations.

"As a mom of a 9-month old, I know firsthand that one of the greatest barriers to working as a parent is lack of flexible work schedules and access to child-care," said co-founder and chief operating officer Lauren Kassan in a statement. "We want to contribute to a world where there is no perceived motherhood penalty."

About 20 percent of The Wing's members have children, and more are having children or plan to in the future, Kassan tells CNBC Make It. Additional childcare and parenting support is one of the top requests from members, Kassan says.

Thus, The Little Wing was created to give all parents a safe place to drop their children off while they work. Certified babysitters, or "Wing-sitters" will be on staff to provide supervision and programming that will include art, music, movement classes, open play and monthly events for different age groups.

There will be programming to help parents as well; topics such as effective sleep and toilet training, mindful co-parenting, queer parenting, family planning, sibling relationships, feeding and stress-reduction will be addressed.

The Little Wing is primarily designed for children ages 1 to 6, although there will be programming for children both younger and older. It is not a substitution for full-time childcare, but will allow members to have two to three hours of work time while their children are cared for by certified babysitters.

While The Wing is exclusively for women, The Little Wing is open to all children, parents and caregivers, Kassan says. Events and other programming will be included in The Wing membership, and babysitting will be an added cost. Kassan says that pricing will be competitive with or less expensive than comparable offerings.

"It doesn't have to be this incredibly hard thing, it just has to be a priority," says Kassan.