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GoDaddy casts eye outside US, says Asia key for expansion with mobile

GoDaddy, an internet domain registrar and web hosting company, is casting its eyes outside the U.S. as it targets half a billion small businesses worldwide in its global expansion.

"Our mission is to help individuals take all ideas from inception all the way through to reality," said GoDaddy's chief product officer, Steven Aldrich.

Asia will be a key area for its expansion, he told CNBC on the sidelines of the InnovFest Unbound 2017 conference.

In Singapore on Wednesday, the company launched its next generation website builder which allows users to build, publish and edit a website on their mobile devices.

"You can do everything on your mobile phone. There is not a feature that is on the next generation website that you need to go to your desktop for," he said.

The product is localized for different markets.

Adrich did not say if the website domain name provider was looking to acquire companies in Asia but said the region is important for the company that is committed to working with small businesses.

"When I think about our expansion, Asia is a key piece of that...Bring us ideas. We are happy to look at ways to help small businesses grow their footprint online, help to manage their business as they grow. We'll look at any company that's got an interesting business that's having traction in this segment," he said.

GoDaddy is going global with its expansion plans.
Richard Levine | Corbis | Getty Images
GoDaddy is going global with its expansion plans.

Aldrich's comments came after GoDaddy reported better-than-expected first quarter revenue revenue of $489.7 million with quarterly international revenue up 17 percent up from a year ago.

The company completed the acquisition of European rival Host Europe Group last month. In March, it announced the acquisition of Sucuri, a website security provider.

With half a billion small businesses globally and just 30 million of these based in the U.S., there are many more opportunities for GoDaddy, he added.

In China, where online services are heavily regulated, the company is still trying to "find the right entry path", Aldrich said.