Business Canada

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Economic Stimulus Package

    The global recovery looks to be slowing more than expected as growth weakens in the world's rich economies, and monetary stimulus should be extended or stepped up if the slowdown proves more than momentary, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Thursday.

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    From candy to cows and strippers to sparklers, the government wants to charge you extra for just about everything these days. Here are 12 of the wackiest taxes you may be paying.

  • Herein are the Thursday's biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of The Hain Celestial Group popped while Royal Bank of Canada dropped.

  • If your American bank bet isn't working out, Veracruz founder Steve Cortes recommends going "north of the border."

  • Why he thinks it's important to have at least one international stock in your portfolio.

  • How you can capitalize on the ag bull market Cramer thinks is "here to stay."

  • Victorian houses in St. John' s, Newfoundland

    I got a call this afternoon from Prof. Karl Case, the first half of the well-watched "Case-Shiller Home Price Indices." He had seen my piece about Canada in our Housing Fix series last week and wanted to add his two cents. Specifically he wanted to point out how "in the high interest rate environment you get a completely different scenario as the low interest rate environment," when you compare the Canadian and the U.S. housing boom and busts.

  • Alberta Oil Sands

    Canada has proven oil reserves of more than 170 billion barrels—second only to Saudi Arabia. Much of that crude lies beneath the tundra of Alberta in a thick oil, sand and water mixture called bitumen, more commonly called oil sand.

  • Here's what analysts and others say they're watching before the bell Tuesday.

  • Canadian flag

    Canada raised its key overnight lending rate .25% to .50% Tuesday despite the world-wide caution over the trend in global economic affairs.

  • Canadian flag

    As the rest of the world speculates which bank/country/continent will require another bailout, Canada serves as a “shining” example on how to escape the debt spiral, Jim O’Neill, chief economist at Goldman Sachs, told CNBC on Tuesday.

  • The Cuban flag flying in Park Central in Havana.

    American industries of all kinds—from travel and telecom to construction and energy—would be poised to profit if the 52-year trade embargo with Cuba were lifted. Among the first businesses to cash in would be those involved with tourism, most experts agree.

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    A little known program allows foreigners to invest in U.S. businesses and create jobs in exchange for a green card. Think of it as "immigration through investment". Foreigners can apply for it by proving they'll pour $1 million into a U.S. company.

  • Nouriel Roubini

    Stocks are likely to continue their aggressive decline and shed another 20 percent as the world economy weakens, economist Nouriel Roubini told CNBC.

  • The Syncrude oil sands extraction facility near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta Province, Canada.

    Beneath the subarctic forests of western Canada, deep under the peat bogs and herds of wild caribou, lies the tarry rock that is one of America’s top sources of imported oil. The NYT reports.

  • No one’s worried about the loonie. Or the country’s bonds, for that matter. So consider this leading national bank.

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    Last week’s sharp drops and heightened volatility were due in part to the severe debt crisis in Greece and, more specifically, growing fears that other European nations are at risk — especially Spain, Portugal, Italy and Ireland.

  • U.S. passport

    Amid mounting frustration over taxation and banking problems, small but growing numbers of overseas Americans are taking the weighty step of renouncing their citizenship. The New York Times explains.

  • The U.S. dollar's strength appears to be waning as the focus turns from Europe's debt worries to China's possible appreciation of its currency, Chris Zwermann, global strategist and technical analyst at Zwermann Financial said Tuesday.