Economic Measures Depression

  • LIMA, Sept 16- Peru's central bank on Friday trimmed its economic growth outlook for 2017 to 4.5 percent from 4.6 in June, citing uncertainty over new government policies and the risk of Republican nominee Donald Trump winning the U.S. presidential election in November. Central Bank President Julio Velarde said he was unsure of the economic impacts of reforms...

  • Depressed worker office

    The U.K. is enduring Blue Monday, the most depressing day of the year, as the weather worsens and Britons get back into the daily grind.

  • Physiological standards for pilots high enough?

    Discussing whether the rules need to be modified for pilots who display serious depression, with Dr. Gail Saltz, New York Presbyterian psychiatrist.

  • 'I don't buy Plosser's comments': Economist

    Jerry Webman, Chief Economist & Senior Investment Strategist at OppenheimerFunds, explains why he disagrees with the comments of Charles Plosser, President at Federal Reserve of Philadelphia.

  • Alan Greenspan

    Central banks around the world are repeating the mistakes of former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan by flooding markets with cheap money, according to Brunel University's Moorad Choudhry.

  • A report suggests 20-somethings living in their parents' basement may take after the thrifty, debt-averse survivors of the Great Depression.

  • recession.jpg

    After Portugal's rejection of the cost-cutting measures on which its bailout package depends, Invesco Perpetual's chief economist has added his voice to the anti-austerity camp, warning it could lead to "almost endless depression".

  • Despite recent stock market gains, famed strategist Douglas Kass thinks stocks face many headwinds.

  • Five Players Who Can Drive Us Over the ‘Fiscal Cliff’

    The fiscal cliff may sound like the name of an exercise retreat on a mountain top in Southern California, but the reality is not so pretty. What it refers to is the potentially dire economic situation the U.S. faces at the end of 2012.  Here's a look.

  • The Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

    The fiscal crisis for states will persist long after the economy rebounds as they confront rising health care costs, underfunded pensions, ignored infrastructure needs, eroding revenues and expected federal budget cuts, according to a report issued here Tuesday by a task force of respected budget experts, the New York Times reports.

  • Real Danger of a New Great Depression: Author

    "In order to understand this crisis it is necessary to understand the role that credit has played in bringing it about, when we broke the link between money and gold 40 years ago, this removed all the constraints on credit creation and afterwards credit exploded," Richard Duncan author of The New Depression: The Breakdown of the Paper Money Economy, told CNBC.

  • Krugman on How to End This Depression

    Paul Krugman, "End This Depression Now!" author, discusses the financial crisis that triggered the greatest downturn since the Great Depression, and offers ways to move forward.

  • President Barack Obama speaking at the Associated Press luncheon during the ASNE Convention.

    President Obama is presiding over an economic recovery that is “dead last in the modern era,” Texas Congressman Kevin Brady said Friday on CNBC.

  • Shiller: Raise Taxes Temporarily to Get Out of Weak Economy

    Yale professor, Robert Shiller shares his perspective on whether the U.S. is in the midst of a "late great depression" and how temporarily raising taxes could help stimulate economic recovery.

  • American investor and financial commentator Jim Rogers visits a branch of Xiangcai Securities  in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province of China.

    The recent decline in commodity prices has little to do with fundamentals and everything to do with the collapse of brokerage firm MF Global, says renowned investor Jim Rogers, who described the sell-off as artificial.

  • Job Losses

    The world economy is on the verge of a new and deeper jobs recession that will delay the global recovery further and may spark social unrest in "scores of countries," the International Labor Organization said on Monday.

  • Unemployed men queuing for coffee and bread at a soup kitchen run by the Bahai Fellowship at 203 East 9th Street, New York, circa 1930.

    The countries that will have the most success in weakening the real value of their currencies "are likely to flourish better or at least suffer less than others," author Andrew Smithers wrote.

  • Jim Rogers

    The U.S. economy is likely to experience a period of stagflation worse than the 1970s, which would cause bond yields to spike, commodity bull Jim Rogers told CNBC on Friday. Rogers said governments were lying about the inflation problem and the recent rally in Treasurys was a bubble.

  • People wait in line at a government employment office in the center of Madrid.

    ”An economic depression occurs only once it becomes painfully obvious that the markets and economy are failing to respond to repeated bouts of policy stimulus,” says economist David Rosenberg.

  • Tower Bridge and City of London financial district

    The current UK depression will be the longest since at least the first world war. Without a dramatic surge in growth, it is also quite likely to generate a bigger cumulative loss of output than the “great depression”, Martin Wolf writes in the FT.