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  • Will Dangers Spoil Markets' Party Mood? Tuesday, 29 Mar 2011 | 3:20 AM ET
    Question Marks

    The current market environment reminds me of the movie “Wayne’s world” that I saw longer ago than I care to remember. The party mood on the markets just continues in the face of clear and present dangers.

  • Japan’s Electricity Shortage to Last Months Monday, 28 Mar 2011 | 11:25 PM ET
    Electric power poles lean over a road March 21, 2011 in Asahi, Chiba, Japan. Japan.Ten days after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan, the death toll has risen to at least 8,600 dead with thousands still missing. Presently the country is struggling to contain a potential nuclear meltdown after the nuclear plant was seriously damaged from the quake.

    The term “rolling blackouts” has become shorthand for noting one way Japan is trying to cope with its national calamity. Experts say it may be next year before anything close to full electrical power is restored in Japan. The New York  Times reports.

  • Yoshikami: Four Days in Asia Monday, 28 Mar 2011 | 9:45 AM ET

    The reality is, in this century, a global perspective is necessary when investing for portfolio success. Latin America, developing Europe, the Middle East, and Africa all hold promise. And without a doubt the brightest beacon for emerging growth today is Asia.

  • A Radical Kind of Reactor Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 2:37 AM ET
    A doctor checks uses a giger counter to check the level of radiation on a woman

    While engineers at Japan’s stricken nuclear power plant struggle to keep its uranium fuel rods from melting down, engineers in China are building a radically different type of reactor that some experts say offers a safer nuclear alternative, the New York  Times reports.

  • How Nuclear Accidents Affected Markets 30 Days Later Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 12:55 PM ET
    Quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Futaba, Fukushima

    A CNBC analysis of how markets reacted to previous nuclear accidents may help explain and predict the impact of the emergency in Japan.

  • Damaged houses, cars and debris after the earthquake

    Talk about a morning with wildly inconsistent messages about the auto industry's ability to build vehicles in the wake of the Japan earthquake and tsunami.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Despite record inflows into the Japanese ETF, options traders are less than optimistic about a Japanese recovery.

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Here's what you should be watching Thursday, March 24.

  • Cramer: This Is the 'Most Exciting' Stock In the Dow Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 3:19 PM ET

    Why the "Mad Money" host is bullish on this construction machinery name right now.

  • A couple walks past upturned vehicles sitting on a wall in the city of Miyako

    Almost two weeks since an earthquake and tsunami devastated a large part of Japan and forced Japanese automakers to shut down their plants, there's a growing panic with American car buyers.

  • Yoshikami: How to Outsmart Global Crises! Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 11:06 AM ET

    There is no shortage of challenges facing the world today and many investors are frozen waiting for clarity in these times of uncertainty. The problem is, in all likelihood, the world will not settle down any time soon and we will surely continue to see geopolitical shifts and unrest plaguing the investment world. So what are investors to do?

  • Japan Crisis Won't Derail ECB Rate Plans: Official Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 9:33 AM ET
    Jean-Claude Trichet

    The crisis in Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands of people will not have an effect on the European Central Bank's interest rate policy, Manfred Schepers, vice-president finance and chief financial officer for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, told CNBC.

  • Diplomas, and an Uncertain Future, for Japanese Pupils Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 2:21 AM ET
    A school pupil receives a graduation certificate during the graduation ceremony at Takkon Elementary School on March 22, 2011 in Ofunato, Iwate, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,0

    Schools in Japan begin class in April and hold graduation ceremonies in March; like spring, they represent renewal and rebirth. On Tuesday morning, in a school meeting hall in the tsunami-ravaged seaport of Kesennuma, it became something else: an act of defiance. The NYT reports.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    It was truly a trial by fire — one that has now become part of Russia’s nuclear marketing message.  How Chernobyl made Russia the most safety-conscious nuclear proponent. The NYT reports.

  • Deere Sees Itself Doubling in Size Over 8 Years: CEO Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 3:49 PM ET

    Heavy-machinery company Deere still sees itself doubling in size over the next eight years, due in large part to construction and agriculture in Asia, the corporation’s CEO, Samuel Allen, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Natural Gas Now Viewed as Safer Bet Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 4:41 AM ET
    Natural Gas

    Natural gas may be having its day, as its rival energy sources come under a cloud. The serious problems at the nuclear power plant in Japan have raised new doubts about the safety of nuclear energy the New York Times reports.

  • Fears of Another Downturn Overplayed: Jim O'Neill Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 1:30 AM ET
    Anti-Gaddafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes.

    Fears that the world economy is facing another downturn are being overplayed, despite the political upheaval caused by recent unrest in the Middle East and the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan, Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said.

  • Tiffany Cuts Earnings on Japan Store Closures Monday, 21 Mar 2011 | 7:13 PM ET
    Tiffany Gift Box

    Tiffany is reducing its first-quarter earnings forecast as it deals with some store closings and limited hours in Japan, in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami there.

  • Changing Global Outlook  Monday, 21 Mar 2011 | 7:46 AM ET

    CNBC's Steve Liesman takes a look at how economists are changing their forecasts in response to recent events.

  • Crises in Japan Ripple Across Global Economy Monday, 21 Mar 2011 | 5:27 AM ET
    80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.