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No 'House of Cards' Streaming Spike for Netflix: Sandvine

Monday, 4 Feb 2013 | 5:40 PM ET
Kevin Spacey in "House of Cards"
Source: NewOnNetflix
Kevin Spacey in "House of Cards"

Just days after Netflix debuted its long-awaited original show "House of Cards," many are wondering how it fared. Did the show, which premiered Friday, lure in new subscribers or get current subscribers to hunker down and watch it all weekend?

(Read More: Netflix's 'House of Cards' Binge Strategy.)

While Netflix isn't saying right now, an independent company has early results.

According to a company called Sandvine, Netflix traffic wasn't notably different this weekend than prior weekends. Translation: no spike in viewing.

Sandvine, which monitors Internet data usage, has reported that Netflix is the largest source of Internet traffic. Sandvine can't see what people are viewing. It just measures how much Internet bandwidth the company's streaming videos take up.

Netflix, however, won't reveal any new subscriber numbers until its next earnings announcement and isn't revealing any details about streaming activity.

(Read More: Netflix Delivers Surprise Profit, Outlook; Shares Jump.)

Despite the lack of data on Netflix's new premium content, Netflix shares bucked the downward trend and jumped 6 percent higher Monday, boosted by a number of analyst reports.

Netflix Plays its Cards
CNBC's Julia Boorstin reports on Netflix's first original series, "House of Cards"; and Richard Tullo, Albert Fried & Company and CNBC's Herb Greenberg talk about Netflix's big bet on original content.

On Monday morning, BMO Capital Markets analyst Ed Williams raised his estimates and price target to $165 from $135, now rating the company "market perform."

"Following the continued significant investment in content (including exclusive shows), we have increased confidence that the company will maintain" its position as "dominant streaming video service provider by a wide margin," he wrote.

(Read More: Netflix Content a Game-Changer?)

Williams said the company is poised to capitalize off the growth of streaming video.

On Friday, Morgan Stanley's Scott Devitt increased his expectations for the company's subscriber growth, pointing to Netflix's strategy of investing in original content.

—By CNBC's Julia Boorstin; Follow her on Twitter: @JBoorstin

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  • Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.