Stocks Alcoa Inc

  • Stocks wobbled Wednesday as economic worries continued to nag the market and rain on the post-Gustav rally.

  • Stocks finished lower Tuesday as weakness in technology stocks sucked the air out the earlier  rally inspired by oil's drop and the dollar's surge.

  • After jumping up over 200 points this morning, the Dow has reversed course and is now in negative territory for the day.  The S&P 500 also jumped, rising above 1300 before falling back down.  Interestingly, at one point during the swing, the S&P was down more than the Dow was down.  The Dow is priced roughly 9 times higher than the S&P 500.  Given the difference in scale, it is somewhat unusual to see this happen when they move in the same direction.

  • Stocks came charging out of the gate, inspired by oil's drop and the dollar's surge, but weakness in technology stocks sucked the air out of the rally.

  • Stocks kicked off September with a rally, inspired by the more than $7 drop in oil prices and a surge in the dollar.

  • The Great Commodity Unwind of 2008, which began in July, picked up steam this morning. Remember the trade: investors have not only been long commodities, they have been long the currency of major commodity producers like Australia, and short the dollar. That unwind is now accelerating, with positive implications for U.S. consumers and stocks.

  • Alcatel-Lucent named its new leadership on Tuesday, handing the task of turning round the loss-making telecoms equipment group to former British Telecom chief executive and industry veteran Ben Verwaayen.

  • Stocks shot out of the gate Tuesday as the price of oil plunged more than $7 and the dollar surged.

  • Rio Tinto

    Chinese aluminum maker Chinalco, which holds a minority stake in Anglo-Australian miner Rio Tinto, may raise its stake if market conditions are right but it has no timetable for such a move, its president said on Monday.

  • Stocks advanced Thursday after second-quarter GDP was revised to show growth was more robust than first thought and oil receded to around $118 a  barrel after earlier topping $120.

  • Stocks opened higher Thursday after the second reading on second-quarter GDP showed growth was more robust than first thought.   Tropical Storm Gustav, which is readying to move back to hurricane status and heading toward the Gulf Coast, continued to hover over the market and bump up oil prices.

  • U.S. stock-index futures rebounded Thursday after the second reading on second-quarter GDP showed growth was more robust than first thought.  Tropical Storm Gustav, which is readying to move back to hurricane status and heading toward the Gulf Coast, continued to hover over the market and bump up oil prices.

  • With Labor Day weekend coming this week, the markets have had a tough summer.  Is this a normal part of "sell in May" or is this year different?  Here's how this year compares.

  • A Bank of America branch.

    Do you believe that financials, pharma and telecom can maintain through an economic downturn? If so, you might want to take a look at the Dow Industrials where some of the largest companies in the world are currently offering investors notably large dividend yields.

  • As oil has fallen at the end of the trading week to its lowest level since early May, CNBC asked the experts where to invest your money now.

  • 080814 CPI.jpg

    The Consumer Price Index is now at levels not seen since 1991.  Here is a breakdown of the inflation benchmark to show you where costs are rising most.

  • If the trading seems a bit tentative and confusing, you're on the right track. And don't blame it on traders on vacation; there's plenty of that, but there's a reason for the market's uncertainty.

  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.

  • It all comes down to three important factors, Cramer says.

  • Two weeks after reporting huge losses, Merrill Lynch has surprised the Street with significant sales and capital raising. They are: 1) selling $30.6 b in CDOs. They were carried on the books at a value of $11.1 b; buyer Lone Star is paying $6.7 b ($0.22 on the dollar), but Merrill is financing three-quarters of the sale;