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  • Stocks ended lower as the unraveling of one of the biggest deals this year overshadowed gains in the energy sector.

  • NYSE Traders

    While the overall market is unlikely to stage a major turnaround any time soon, experts agree there are a handful of investments that are heating up and could help you recoup some gains.

  • Many comparisons have been made between the current economic climate and the Depression era.  With the Dow and S&P poised to have their worst yearly performances since 1931, here's a look at what happened in the years that followed.

  • Technology shares and the financials have been tough to trade this year. Is it time to dip a toe – or will you just get burned?

  • After another 100 points shed in the market today, Cramer says only one thing would make him feel better: if just one portfolio manager would come out and admit that this is, in fact, not a good time to buy. Instead, there are a whole lot of "experts" out there insisting that they love this market and it's a great time to buy -- there's a lot of money to be made in the volatility, they say.

  • As if investors don’t have enough reason to be wary of the financials, a new cause for concern is coming to light.

  • Stocks ended lower Tuesday, as a quick mood booster from an upbeat consumer sentiment reading wore off, and the drag of GM and financials set in.

  • Stocks advanced Tuesday as the market mood got a boost from an improvement in consumer sentiment.

  • The specter of illiquidity is negating any good news this economy can muster, Cramer says.

  • The bad news is, there's going to be a lot more bad news.  The good news is, it's pretty well priced into the market.  That's how Al Frank Asset Management's chief portfolio manager, John Buckingham, sees it.

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    After receiving billions in aid from U.S. taxpayers, the nation's largest banks say they can't track exactly how they're spending the money or they simply refuse to discuss it.

  • The stock market ended both the day and the week essentially flat, with the twin stimuli of interest rate cuts and an automaker bailout unable to overcome a weakening economy and pessimism about the future of the banking system.

  • Stocks advanced Friday after Bush announced details of a rescue plan for auto makers.

  • Treasury Secretary Nominee Robert Rubin

    It may be the season to be wealthy — at least on Wall Street, where banks are awarding annual bonuses despite a growing outcry over pay, the New York Times reported.

  • U.S. stock index futures pointed to a cautiously higher open for Wall Street Friday as troubled automakers reportedly are close to an emergency loan deal.

  • Credit card swipe

    Consumers will be shielded from increases in interest rates on existing account balances on their credit cards under new rules being adopted by federal regulators.

  • Ed McMahon

    Countrywide, owned by Bank of America confirms to me that it has finally sold the mortgages to Ed McMahon's home. Foreclosure Trackers says it bought the loan on behalf of a private investor who is allowing McMahon to stay in the house.

  • Some of the bad news Tuesday was "less worse" than many feared: Goldman Sachs reported its first quarterly loss since going public — but the $2.1 billion loss was much narrower than many had feared and Goldman shares rose as much as 11 percent. Stocks soared on the Federal Reserve rate-cut decision and options trading looks bullish on Boeing. CNBC heard from experts who predict a massive OPEC cut and more Fed moves to come.

  • Crowd of people on the street

    Drugmaker Bristol-Myers Squibb became the latest big company to announce layoffs, saying it will eliminate another 10 percent of its work force through 2010.

  • Stocks shot up Tuesday after the Federal Reserve dramatically cut interest rates.