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  • Stocks opened lower Monday as Friday's euphoria cooled with investors realizing that financial woes could go on for quite some time and a fresh wave of new developments emerged.

  • US stock index futures were lower ahead of the open on Monday, as Friday's euphoria cooled with investors realizing banks are still facing severe hits to balance sheet valuations and limited future earnings despite a financial bailout plan from the government.

  • US stock index futures were lower ahead of the open on Monday, as Friday's euphoria cooled with investors realizing banks are still facing severe hits to balance sheet valuations and limited future earnings despite a financial bailout plan from the government.

  • For the historic week ending Friday, September 19, 2008,  the major U.S. Indices managed to close mixed and almost flat after one of the most volatile trading weeks ever, driven by the collapse of investment bank, Lehman Brothers, enormous government actions around the globe, and billion dollar deal making.  In one week, the government bailed out AIG, pumped funds into money markets, and banned short selling of financials - all while keeping the Fed Funds target unchanged and taking unprecedented actions to halt the liquidity crisis.  The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) surpassed the benchmark level of 30, hitting an intraday high of 42.16 on Thursday, its highest level since 10/2002.    The major indices were all up and down +/- 3% for 4 of the past 5 days.  The Dow posted a 2 day point move of more than 778 points as of Friday’s close, after plummeting 811 between Monday and Wednesday and hitting 10,609.66, its lowest level since 11/9/2005.  On Friday, The Nasdaq Composite recorded a 2-day point move of greater than 175 points after it closed down 109.05 points on Wednesday, its first triple digit decline for one day since it began trading after the 9/11 attacks.  The S&P 500 flirted with record territory closing up 98.7 over the last two days, marking its biggest 2-day point move since 3/16/2000, the largest 2-day point move ever.

  • Uncertainty is likely to continue in the financial sector for at least another two weeks, causing more depression, Ralph Silva, research director at Tower Group, told CNBC on Thursday.

  • British bank Barclays said it could acquire some of Lehman Brothers' businesses while economists discuss the future of the financial sector. Following are today's top videos:

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    Wall Street suffered another beating Wednesday at the hands of investors panicking over the state of large banks, as they flocked from stocks and sent safe-haven areas like gold soaring.

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    Stocks rallied at the close after the Federal Reserve held the line on interest rates and investors were encouraged that Lehman Brothers and American International Group might work out deals to improve their perilous financial situation.

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    When stadium naming rights started taking hold in the sports stadium building boom of the 90s, the airlines swooped in. Delta bought the rights to the arena in Utah in 1991, America West took Phoenix in 1992, United bought the Chicago Bulls and Chicago Blackhawks venue in 1994.

  • Stocks had their worst selloff since the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001, with the Dow plummeting more than 500 points amid escalating fear about a collapse of AIG.

  • Stocks fell sharply at the opening bell Monday after a trifecta of Wall Street pain: Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, Merrill Lynch was bought by Bank of America and AIG asked the Fed for short-term financing.

  • Stocks fell sharply at the opening bell Monday after a trifecta of Wall Street pain: Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, Merrill Lynch was bought by Bank of America and AIG asked the Fed for short-term financing.

  • Stocks looked set to plummet Monday after a trifecta of Wall Street pain: Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy, Merrill Lynch was bought by Bank of America and AIG asked the Fed for short-term financing.

  • U.S. activist hedge fund Atticus Capital has lost more than $5 billion this year, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters, after its funds were hit by heavy falls in financial stocks.

  • From mid-July to late July short interest dropped 5.34 percent, on average, in the shares of 17 major financial firms affected by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission emergency short-selling rule, according to the latest data from the exchange.

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    British bank Barclays reported a 33 percent drop in first-half profits as it took a 2 billion pound writedown on the value of risky assets, but the profit drop was not as steep as expected.

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    Despite their record breaking profits, Exxon Mobil dragged the Dow lower Thursday after its earnings fell short of Wall Street's expectations. Also comments from Alan Greenspan made on CNBC added to the downward momentum.

  • New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)

    One year into the credit crisis that led to the near-collapse of Bear Stearns,  some big U.S. investment banks are down, but probably won't get taken out right now.

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    Financial industry executives are mustering on Capitol Hill to head off a Congressional effort to rewrite the rules for the nation’s energy markets, saying it could unsettle already nervous markets and push more energy trading abroad, beyond the reach of domestic regulators.

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    Barclays' shareholders took up just 19 percent of new shares in the British bank's recently announced fundraising, meaning the bulk of the money will be provided by mostly new "anchor" investors led by Qatar.