Stocks Choice Hotels International Inc

  • The Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios, Orlando, FL

    Just how strong is the U.S. economy right now? Good question.  Tough answer. We picked four specific segments of the consumer economy and are taking a look inside the stocks to find some answers. Hotels. Restaurants. Theme parks. Appliances.

  • New England Patriots fans wait in line to pick up their Super Bowl tickets at Gillette Stadium.

    ConvergExMarket Group’s Nicholas Colas takes an annual look at “Super Bowl economics” to get a peek into the mind of the luxury consumer and this year there is very little inflation in ticket prices. What gives?

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Wednesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Trends in the last several months have been getting “less worse” in the hotel industry, said Patrick Scholes, hotel and lodging analyst at FBR Capital Markets. He told investors where they should be putting money to work.

  • Bed bugs

    Yes, bed bugs are back — not just in apartment buildings, but also in hospitals and hotels and motels.

  • Car on road

    The great American road trip is back, and that could be good news for Choice Hotels International, which franchises value hotel chains like Comfort Inn. We talked to CEO Steve Joyce, who says he sees signs of stabilization in his niche of the travel industry.

  • Q: On Fast Money’s trader radar we look at the stock that was lighting up screens across Wall Street. Founded in 1939 by 7 independent motel owners in southern Florida, this company became the nation’s first hotel chain. The operator of affordable hotels now owns big value names like Comfort Inn and Econo Lodge and the company's investors will be sleeping soundly tonight  after the stock rose on higher than expected fourth quarter earnings. Who is it?

  • Miami, Florida

    U.S. hotels and airlines are bracing for softer demand as the economy shows signs of slowing, but the pain may not hit the travel industry for months.