×

Stocks Chevron Corp

  • The euro is up again, so European bourses are up for the most part. Next test will be Spain, which will auction 10 and 30 year bonds on Thursday. The UK's FTSE and France's CAC indices are both having their first five-day winning streak in nearly four months. Also: Finally, some good news for IPOs.

  • With chatter that BP or its assets may be on somebody’s shopping list,  the obvious question: Which big oil company is most financially fit to do those kind of deals? Exxon Mobil.

  • The desk is keeping a close eye on the S&P with the major index flirting with 1108, its 200 day moving average. What should you make of it?

  • Video still of oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Patriotic Americans bought war bonds to finance the path to victory in a just cause. Why not use the same tool again — call them Freedom Bonds — to end another form of global tyranny?

  • So far this year, a total of 135 companies have raised, initiated or reinstated dividends; only two firms have cut them. Is this another signal that the economy is rebounding? Robert Froehlich, senior managing director at The Hartford, and John Dorfman, portfolio manager of Dorfman Value Fund, offered their insights and their best plays.

  • A hazardous material clean-up truck owned by the Chevron Oil Company arrives at a command center in Liberty Park.

    Emergency workers believe they have stopped a 21,000-gallon oil leak from reaching the environmentally sensitive Great Salt Lake, one of the West's most important inland water bodiesfor migratory birds that use it as a place to rest, eat and breed.

  • Wall Street sign

    Stocks will navigate choppy waters in the week ahead, but could sail a bit more smoothly—barring any nasty, new surprises from Europe.

  • The US-UK spat over BP is a serious topic of discussion among traders. They are worried that this could get out of hand. They are worried that the meeting between the president and BP officials scheduled for next week will turn into another public humiliation of BP.

  • Stocks were higher in afternoon trading Thursday, led by energy and industrials, as encouraging economic news out of the U.S. and China fueled recovery hopes.

  • Stocks were higher in afternoon trading Thursday, led by energy and industrials, as encouraging economic news out of the U.S. and China fueled recovery hopes.

  • Stocks opened higher Thursday after a drop in jobless claims and confirmation of strong Chinese exports.

  • The Lightning Round is extended in this CNBC.com exclusive feature.

  • Tony Hayward, BP Group Chief Executive

    BP, already bedeviled by an out-of-control oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, now finds itself with one more problem: Tony Hayward, its gaffe-prone chief executive. The NYT reports.

  • The little-known reason why BP will likely continue to pay dividends.

  • The latest plan to stop the oil flowing from a BP site in the Gulf of Mexico may not work as well as originally hoped, the U.S. Coast Guard said Thursday. Many experts are now planning for the worst. What is the long-term impact of the spill on the economy? Steve Blitz, senior economist at Majestic Research discussed his insights.

  • Investors are playing the markets carefully during these volatile conditions but stocks will resume their way up once the wave of international bad news subsides, Robert Doll, BlackRock vice chairman, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • BP headquarters in London.

    BP’s stock price has plummeted over the past month, sparking talk on whether it is vulnerable to a takeover. But given the massive uncertainty surrounding the costs of the oil spill, BP may prove to be a cheap, but messy target, analysts told CNBC.com.

  • Thanks Fitch. The ratings agency's latest downgrade could force the market to again test key levels of resistance. What must you know?

  • BP shares have tumbled more than 25 percent since the explosion in the Gulf coast last month, but are trading higher Thursday. Is this a good time to get into the firm? Mark Gilman, oil analyst at The Benchmark Company, shared his insights.

  • Stocks erased most of their earlier losses in the final half-hour of trading Tuesday as materials and consumer discretionary stocks advanced.