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  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • The Big Three

    The foundering Detroit automakers owe more than $100 billion to their bankers and bondholders, and Wall Street is starting to wonder how much of that will be paid back, the New York Times reports.

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    Have you been listening to political leaders talk about what it will take for the Detroit 3 and the UAW to get Washington to sign off on a bailout for the industry? If so, you've heard several key words and phrases used to describe what the auto makers need to do.

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    The key audacity was Rick Wagoner’s claim that he shouldn’t step aside because nobody else would really know how to successfully run General Motors. With a huge salary, big bonus, hot and cold running jets and a constant supply of new cars to drive, it’s understandable that Rick doesn’t want to give up his job. But he should.

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    Still feeling shocked by how much your portfolio has fallen in value in the past couple of months?  With the holidays upon us, here is a look at the purchasing power those shares still have.  After all, a share of Berkshire Hathaway can still buy you a Porsche 911.

  • Stocks rallied Friday, with the Dow soaring nearly 500 points,  following news that Obama has picked Geithner as Treasury Secretary. Friday's gains helped offset much of the week's losses, pushing the Dow back above 8,000.

  • The one thing everybody seems to remember from the auto bailout hearings this week is the private jets.

  • In the last 'Stop Trading' segment of yet another dramatic week in U.S. and global markets, Cramer talks to Erin Burnett (together in the same room for the first time in quite a while). After trading some banter about her recent sojourn in Russia, they bring up Citigroup, Wal-Mart and several other stocks on Cramer's mind.

  • Shoppers rush to get in line outside of the Best Buy early Friday, Nov. 24, 2006, in Jackson, Miss., to take advantage of the Black Friday bargains. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    Discount and dollar stores are back in fashion and back in the black. Just about everyone else has his back to the wall.

  • Stocks woke up Friday following news that President-Elect Barack Obama is expected to announce two key cabinet posts.

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    Back when things made sense in the stock market, a company announcing layoffs would be greeted as a positive sign that it was shoring up its bottom line.

  • Chaos reigns Friday: Lame-duck White House and Congress are unable to reach a decision on the financial crisis. Yet Citigroup stock inched up, despite misgivings over the CEO's determination not to break up the firm. And while legislators dither over the jet-setting Big 3 automakers' fates, one strategist told CNBC that Ford Motor stock could yet quadruple overnight. (You read that correctly.)

  • Stocks bounced back Friday after a two-day selloff that saw major indexes crash through support levels and shaved 872 points off the Dow.

  • None of my recent pharma-related posts have received nearly as much feedback as I got from my off-the-reservation blog Thursday about Jetgate. The poll drew more than 2,000 votes yesterday, running 4-to-1 in favor of the CEOs of General Motors, Ford and Chrysler flying commercial instead of on private aircraft to and from Washington this week.

  • Big 3 CEO's

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is saying that Congress is ready to help Detroit on one huge condition. "You show us the plan (for using $25 billion to become healthier companies) and will show you the money," Pelosi said.

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • U.S. stocks looked set for an end-of-week rally Friday with the Dow futures gaining around 200 points ahead of the open, but recent declines have left investors with little trust in upswings.

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    Stocks plunged yet again on Thursday, sending the S&P 500 to its lowest level since 1997 – and completely erasing more than a decade of stock market gains.

  • Volume was heavier; instead of a low volume, high volatility sell-off, this was an old fashioned high volume, high volatility sell-off; in other words, sellers materialized.

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.