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GlaxoSmithKline PLC

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  • First Tysabri, Now Rituxan Tuesday, 19 Dec 2006 | 1:33 PM ET

    The same rare, but fatal viral infection that forced Biogen Idec and Elan to recall, and recently relaunch, the multiple sclerosis drug, Tysabri, may also be a side effect of Rituxan, also from Biogen Idec and Genentech. In an SEC filing -- not a press release -- and on the FDA website, the companies and the agency disclosed yesterday evening that two people with lupus died after taking Rituxan.

  • Glaxo Signs Record $2.1bn Deal for Genmab Drug Tuesday, 19 Dec 2006 | 5:07 AM ET

    GlaxoSmithKline has bought global rights to Danish biotech company Genmab's most promising new drug, a treatment for leukemia, in a record deal worth up to $2.1 billion, the two firms said on Tuesday.

  • FDA May Expand Antidepressant Warning Wednesday, 13 Dec 2006 | 12:12 PM ET

    Treatment with antidepressants increases the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in patients up to age 24, according to proposed changes to the drugs' labels unveiled by health officials.

  • The Michael Moore Effect? Monday, 4 Dec 2006 | 2:07 PM ET

    Earlier this year a crew working for documentary filmmaker Michael Moore "crashed" the major scientific oncology conference in Atlanta. Moore's reportedly working on a movie with the working title of "Sicko" about the country's healthcare system and the pharmaceutical industry.

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