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  • Stocks closed higher as a rebound in oil prices boosted energy shares and offset worries about the fate of the auto industry bailout.

  • Murky signs: Markets had rallied Wednesday morning on the belief that an auto industry bailout was all but certain. But some GOP legislators are opposing the White House deal with congressional Democrats. A top analyst sees financials in critical condition until 2010, but a peer says he's been buying bank stocks and socking them away. And a CNBC guest said commodities are going to lead a 50% S&P rally.

  • Stocks rode the enthusiasm over an auto makers bailout and a swift round of profit-taking to stage a rally Wednesday that offset some of the previous day's losses.

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    Ray T from Indiana writes, "We are loaning the auto companies $15 billion to keep them open for the next 4 months to make 3 million cars we don't want. That is $5000 for each!

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    GMAC Financial Services, the financing arm of General Motors, said it hasn't raised enough capital to become a bank holding company and qualify for aid under the government's $700 billion bank rescue plan.

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    GMAC, the troubled auto and mortgage lender, warned it may not have enough capital to become a bankholding company, the latest blow to the battered auto industry.

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    Seventy-three dollars an hour. That figure has become a big symbol in the fight over what should happen to Detroit, but is it reaaly what a UAW worker earns?

  • Alan Mullaly, Robert Nardelli, and Rick Wagoner

    If Washington approves this $15 Billion bailout by the end of today or tomorrow (and yes, I think that will happen) the question will turn to who becomes the "Car Czar." It will be a presidential appointment and it will be crucial to determining if this auto bailout actually works.

  • U.S. stocks looked set for a sharp jump higher at the open Wednesday, as a looming deal to bail out Detroit auto makers raised investor enthusiasm for the industry.

  • Detroit auto makers should be rescued, but through a planned bankruptcy overseen by the federal government, according to real estate magnate Donald Trump.

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    Dylan and Karen start Tuesday's show by agreeing that it looks like "anything goes" with the current market, as the Dow spacer snapped its recent rally to end the day almost 3% down. This drop was not a surprise to those who are in the business and watch for such things -- Dylan says it was "anticipatable" and is just "the market behaving as markets do."

  • Stocks declined Tuesday as more layoffs and lowered outlooks zapped the momentum out of the recent rally.

  • An auto industry bailout package seems inevitable Tuesday — and the dollar and U.S. stocks are riding the expectation higher. The news continued to be glum for small business owners struggling with the recession and retailers, whose holiday sales may be even weaker than expected. But top analysts told CNBC they expect a Christmas-New Year's Eve rally and see an energy stock recovery in the works.

  • Congress and the White House are hoping to reach a final deal Tuesday to provide $15 billion in loans to troubled U.S. automakers. CNBC asked market insiders and members of Congress to share their insight on a bailout for the industry.

  • Sony became one of the latest companies to announce layoffs in attempt to rein in costs and weather the weak economy.

  • Stocks moved off their lows and turned mixed, helped by a smaller-than-expected decline in October pending-homes sales and a rally in big-cap tech shares

  • GM Dealership

    Whatever happens to the Detroit automobile companies, all three carmakers have told Congress they need to cut their dealer networks as a fundamental element of their survival plans.

  • Stocks moved off their lows and turned mixed, helped by a smaller-than-expected decline in October pending-homes sales and a rally in big-cap tech shares

  • U.S. stock index futures indicated a slightly weaker open Tuesday, following a strong rally in the previous session on the back of fresh economic stimulus proposals.

  • A Tacoma pickup truck on the lot of a Toyota dealership.

    The big wheels in the auto industry—General Motors, Ford and Chrysler, among others—have been on a downhill run. But Toyota is a different story altogether.