Stocks General Motors Co

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    In late breaking news Dylan Ratigan reveals that Senate Democrats are preparing a bill to rush financial aid to auto makers.

  • Stocks ended at their session lows Monday following the latest wave of dismal news: Retailers reported profit declines, big banks prepared for job cuts and Japan officially declared itself in a recession.

  • As recession fears continue to spread globally, investment banks like Goldman Sachs scramble to survive — and investment gurus alter their tactics and strategies to roll with the damage. CNBC's expert advisors gave their outlooks on what's coming and what to do about it.

  • NYSE Traders

    While stocks have bounced back from their most recent lows, there's little optimism that the market has found a lasting bottom.  Instead, most analysts see the market retesting those lows well into 2009.

  • Stocks wavered after a morning selloff as investors shrugged of the latest wave of dismal news: Retailers reported profit declines, big banks prepared for job cuts and Japan officially declared itself in a recession.

  • It's not just the auto and auto parts makers that want in on the TARP program! At last count, the mayors of Philadelphia, Phoenix, and Atlanta are also asking for money. Who's next? Well, the Detroit Lions are 0-10 (I kid you not)...they could use a little...something?

  • Stocks declined Monday as the latest wave of dismal news washed over Wall Street: Retailers reported profit declines, big banks prepared for job cuts and Japan officially declared itself in a recession.

  • Carl Icahn

    Wall Street has essentially thrown in the towel lately on Amylin Pharmaceuticals. The shares have plummeted from nearly $30 just three months ago to around $7 today.

  • The latest job cuts  in the banking sector come amid an overall wave of layoffs across the United States as companies move to cut costs in the face of slackening demand and a general economic downturn.

  • .More substantive is the talk of an automotive bailout; GM trading up about 5 percent pre-open. The House and Senate will be debating an interim financing solution this week, until the new administration takes control in late January.

  • Stock index futures were indicating a sharp loss Monday for Wall Street, as investors worried over the future of the auto industry and more signs emerged of a retail slump.

  • GM, Chrysler, and Ford

    United Auto Workers President Ron Gettelfinger said it is critical the Big 3 receive a financial aid package from Congress to avoid one or more of Detroit's auto makers from sliding into a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

  • Another week of volatility is over: major declines Monday through Thursday morning, followed by a huge rally Thursday afternoon, ending with a failed rally today. What's ahead next week? Cramer thinks the downside may not be over and poses a major question: if you knew there was another Lehman Brothers ahead -- the collapse of LB being the instigator for most of the financial crisis that started early this Fall -- would you buy or sell?

  • Stocks attempted to rally this afternoon — and the Dow and S&P even briefly broke into positive territory — but at the end of the day, the downward pressure was just too crushing and stocks ended lower.

  • The U.S. government should provide funding to struggling Detroit automaker General Motors, Wilbur Ross, chairman & CEO of WL Ross & Co., told CNBC on Friday.

  • Markets are braced for more hemorrhaging in jobs, with a Friday employment report expected to record 200,00 more jobs vaporized in October. This would push the jobless rate up two-tenths of a point to 6.3 percent.

  • Stocks retreated Friday after a record drop in retail sales and some dismal fourth-quarter forecasts.

  • Stocks retreated Friday after a record drop in retail sales and some dismal fourth-quarter forecasts.

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    As the mess in Detroit continues to get worse, and the Big Three automakers continue to lobby the government for a bailout, it's looking ever more likely that we could be talking about a Big Two before long.

  • Big 3 Bailout

    For better or worse, the CEOs of GM, Ford, and Chrysler have bought into the idea that this "spinning" is the way to win over the public and law makers. They are no doubt being told that this is the way to stop people from believing Detroit brought many of these problems on themselves.