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  • Woman using a computer

    Next year is shaping up to be a pivotal one for the PC business – and there are a number of reasons.

  • Stocks sank in the last half hour of trading Thursday top close near the sesssion's lows amid light volume after a batch of economic reports failed to provide traders with enough optimism to continue a September rally.  Walt Disney and GE fell, while Hewlett-Packard rose.

  • Stocks sank in the last half hour of trading Thursday after a batch of economic reports failed to provide traders with enough optimism to continue a September rally.  Walt Disney and GE fell, while Hewlett-Packard rose.

  • Stocks turned positive Thursday as technology and consumer stocks gained, and banks fell, and investors absorbed another batch of mixed economic data.  Alcoa and Hewlett-Packard rose, while Walt Disney fell.

  • Stock index futures pointed to a lower open Thursday after an expected jump in weekly jobless claims.

  • A trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange executes a trade with his NYSE E-Broker.

    Second quarter earnings season is likely to create a positive backdrop for stocks, at least temporarily.

  • earnings_central_badge.jpg

    What follows is a roundup of corporate earnings reports for Monday, April 26.

  • Following are moves you might have missed. Find out why shares of CompuCredit and Terex popped while Texas Industries dropped.

  • Intel

    Call it a perfect storm of economic trends for Intel, and the company is grabbing its surfboard, ready for what could be the recovery ride of its life.

  • Intel Earnings

    I know, I know, it's not until Thursday before we get Intel's fourth quarter earnings, but let's tee up the dialogue a little early and see what discussions this might spawn. I, for one, expect this company to beat expectations and also offer a rosier outlook than the Street might be anticipating.

  • Calvin's Balloon Boy costume

    I get the best emails. Let's start with the most recent and work backwards.

  • Call them the Carl Icahns of the west. Stanley Gold and Roy Disney have never been shrinking violets in pushing for management changes at companies where they've invested some of the $2 billion in funds in their Shamrock Holdings. Most famously, the two led the charge to oust Michael Eisner at Disney, a company formed by Roy's father, and his uncle, Walt.

  • As mentioned earlier this week, a number of companies this week have signaled some stabilization in conditions, with some even hinting of a bottom.

  • While indicating a modestly lower open earlier this morning, the markets turned around late in the morning on a strong rebound in financials and the digestion of a series of less pessimistic comments by corporate executives.

  • Following are the day’s biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of Raytheon and Red Hart popped while Wells Fargo and Yahoo! dropped.

  • One of the first orders of business for the new president will be a long, hard look at the budget. The budget deficit will be about $500 billion when Obama is sworn into office, but with the $700 billion TARP plan it should go to $1 trillion quickly.

  • Stocks retreated after a fleeting uptick as investors digested a slew of earnings and some dismal outlooks and signs of a thawing in the credit markets.

  • Stocks turned lower again after paring most of their losses amid more signs of thawing in the seized up credit markets.

  • U.S. stock market index futures pointed to a lower open for Wall Street Tuesday as worries over the health of the economy offset enthusiasm after news of a possible second stimulus package.

  • Apple was among those companies reporting earnings, while Ladenburg Thalmann's Dick Bove was sued sued by a small bank in Florida.