Stocks Wells Fargo & Co

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    Stocks bounced back from a lower open Wednesday, but bank stocks skidded after two of Wall Street's biggest names issued disappointing earnings. Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo both declined, even though the Wells numbers appeared to beat analyst estimates. Traders appeared to be focusing on the sustainability of the Wells numbers, while Morgan's loss was much broader than expectations. Another heavy earnings calendar will shape the market's day again. Read and listen to what the experts had to say...

  • The Chinese get going, again: as the Shanghai Index has hit new 52-week highs, Chinese investors have rushed back into the market, opening the most new stock accounts (484,799 last week) in the past 18 months.

  • Futures indicated a lower open for Wall Street Wednesday as cautious words from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke and Yahoo's missing revenue expectations lent to investors taking profits.

  • Just when it seemed skies had cleared, results from a regional banking giant suggest another storm could be forming.

  • Foreclosure

    Both government and industry have experienced a steep learning curve in battling foreclosures, but two years into the crisis, greater flexibility and more effective measures are combining to produce early signs of improved results.

  • JPMorgan Chase’s earnings report said as much, and this is why you should believe it.

  • Mortgage application

    For the last two years, housing has been at the center of the banking industry’s troubles. But for at least one quarter, it will help lift its results.

  • The New York Stock Exchange, downtown Manhattan.

    Opinions about today's rally are all over the map: 1) it's an options squeeze, and 2) hedge funds have been caught short. Regardless, the good news is the rally is being fueled by far more than Intel.

  • Don't be fooled--the rally is being fueled by far more than Intel. True, there is genuine momentum buying in semiconductors and semiconductor capital equipment stocks today.

  • If anything, Goldman’s handsome profits are a barometer of the government’s bailout of the financial system, from the straight-up handout mechanism called TARP to the Federal Reserve’s less direct, but probably more beneficent, policy of rock bottom interest rates and other favorable lending facilities.

  • How can someone be so positive in the face of falling share prices and growing unemployment? This is how.

  • Twenty of the last 28 Fridays have seen announcements of bank failures. Will this trend come to an end anytime soon? Walter Mix, former commissioner of the California Department of Financial Institutions, and Fred Cannon, KBW co-director of research, offered their outlooks for financials.

  • The Wall Street vet has high hopes for housing, but Cramer isn’t so sure about the call.

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    Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • Yesterday, I flagged some bullish options bets on Alcoa ahead of its earnings tonight, with investors snapping up nearly 50,000 of the 10-strike calls in the August expiry.

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    Are banks asphyxiating the recovery by hoarding money? Matt McCormick, banking analyst at Bahl & Gaynor, and Rick Santelli debate the question.

  • Stocks were under pressure Monday as a dismal jobs report last week and expectations for a gloomy earnings season nagged at the market. But the Dow turned positive as investors took advantage of the selloff and did some bargain hunting.

  • Stocks briefly pared their losses after a report showed improvement in the service sector.

  • After the long Independence Day weekend, futures indicated a lower open for Wall Street as second thoughts about the U.S. economy's recovery spooked investors after last week's worse-than-expected nonfarm payrolls numbers.

  • Stocks capped their third straight down week with a sharp drop Thursday as a weak jobs report muzzled all the green-shoots talk and investors hunkered down. The Dow lost 1.9 percent this week.