Money

Here's how much you have to earn to live comfortably in the 10 most expensive US cities

The San Francisco Bay Area attracts some of the nation's top technology talent.
Adam Jeffery | CNBC

Living in San Francisco costs 92.9 percent more than the U.S. average, according to data from Kiplinger. Residing in Manhattan is even worse: It costs 138.6 percent more than average.

So what does it take to afford the country's most expensive locations? Using MIT's living wage calculator, CNBC Make It found the minimum amount necessary to meet basic needs without relying on outside help. The model takes into account factors such as child care and health insurance, in addition to food and other regular costs.

These numbers account for a family of two adults and one child and don't include conveniences such as restaurant meals, vacations and money left over for investments.

Here's a look at the living wages for the 10 most expensive cities in the U.S., according to Kiplinger's 2018 ranking, as compared to the median annual income for each, according to the U.S. Census.

10. San Diego, California

Cost of living: 46.1 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $67,773
Median household income: $68,117
2016 population: 1,406,630

San Diego, California
SeanPavonePhoto | Getty Images
9. Los Angeles, California

Cost of living: 48 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $65,963
Median household income: $51,538
2016 population:3,976,322

Los Angeles, California
TheCrimsonRibbon | Getty Images
8. Boston, Massachusetts

Cost of living: 48.2 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $66,523
Median household income: $58,516
2016 population: 673,184

Boston
David Joyner | Vetta | Getty Images
7. Seattle, Washington

Cost of living: 49 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $61,920
Median household income: $74,458
2016 population: 704,352

Seattle, the largest city in the Pacific Northwest, has spectacular views of the Cascade mountains to the east and the Olympic mountains to the west.
Bill Hinton | Getty Images
6. Oakland, California

Cost of living: 49.5 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $78,386
Median household income: $57,778
2016 population: 420,005

Downtown Oakland, California.
Jerry Trudell | Getty Images
5. Washington, D.C.

Cost of living: 55.7 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $65,427
Median household income: $72,935
2016 population: 681,170

Washington, DC
Danita Delimont | Getty Images
4. Brooklyn, New York

Cost of living: 82 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $67,817
Median household income: $50,640
2016 population: 2,648,771

Getty Images
3. Honolulu, Hawaii

Cost of living: 88.3 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $62,701
Median household income: $77,161
2016 population: 988,650

Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii
M Swiet Productions | Getty Images
2. San Francisco, California

Cost of living: 92.9 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $78,386
Median household income: $87,701
2016 population: 870,887

San Francisco
Compassandcamera | Getty Images
1. Manhattan, New York

Cost of living: 138.6 percent above U.S. average
Living wage: $67,817
Median household income: $75,513
2016 population: 1,664,727

New York, New York
GCShutter | Getty Images
VIDEO1:0601:06
America’s most expensive home is a mind-blowing $500 million Bel-Air mansion
The San Francisco Bay Area attracts some of the nation's top technology talent.
Adam Jeffery | CNBC
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