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The 11 US companies tech employees want to work for most—and what roles they're hiring for

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Silicon Valley has long been the place to go to join a scrappy start-up or major company investing in emerging technologies that re-imagine the way we live our lives. But that's not to say that a move out West is the only way to land a job at a great tech company.

For Hired's 2019 Global Brand Health Report, the careers site surveyed more than 3,800 tech workers from its platform to find out which companies stood out as the best employers. Broken down by 11 major U.S. markets, workers were asked to identify which tech company in their hometown they'd want to work for most.

Employers who received top marks range in focus from robotics to radio to food delivery, a clear sign that tech work is taking hold and reshaping industries of all sorts.

Here are the local leaders tech workers want to work for most, plus what types of jobs (within the tech space and beyond) each is hiring for.

Indeed

iRobot

Grubhub

Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois

Job openings: market researcher, senior front-end engineer, enterprise business analyst

Toyota North America

Ibotta

Headquarters: Denver, Colorado

Job openings: Salesforce developer, Android engineer, decision scientist

SpaceX

Headquarters: Los Angeles, California

Job openings: electromagnetic environmental effects engineer, orbital tube welder, technical writer

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Vimeo

Headquarters: New York City, New York

Job openings: application security engineer, video transcoding engineer, senior brand designer

Qualcomm

Headquarters: San Diego, California

Job openings: system test engineer, digital hardware engineer, sales forecast analyst

Google

Headquarters: San Francisco, California

Job openings: software engineer, technical program manager, media operations manager

Microsoft

NPR

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