CNBC Fed Survey

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  • Ohio Governor and Republican U.S. presidential candidate John Kasich speaks at a rally in Strongsville, Ohio March 13, 2016.

    A 42 percent plurality says a John Kasich presidency would be best for the economy, followed by 16 percent for Hillary Clinton, says a CNBC Fed survey.

  • Traders work as Janet Yellen, chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve, is seen speaking on a television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015.

    An overwhelming 88 percent of survey respondents say the Fed's next move will be to hike interest rates, but they've put off that hike until May.

  • Fed Survey: Measuring the next hike

    Participants in the CNBC Federal Reserve Survey expect a rate hike to be delayed, not necessarily canceled, reports CNBC's Steve Liesman.

  • Expectations from the Fed

    CNBC's Steve Liesman outlines the results of the latest CNBC survey on expectations from the Federal Reserve.

  • Janet Yellen

    Markets expect the Fed to hike interest rates in December and as many as three more times next year, according to the CNBC Fed Survey.

  • Fed Survey: How many rate hikes in 2016?

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on results from the CNBC Fed Survey.

  • November CPI unchanged

    CNBC's Rick Santelli has the latest data on consumer price inflation. And CNBC's Steve Liesman provides market reaction.

  • Fed survey: 95% expect rate hike Wednesday

    CNBC's Steve Liesman takes a look at the latest expectation on Federal Reserve policy including rate hikes for next year.

  • Fed hawks vs. doves

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on the most dovish versus hawkish Federal Reserve members going into 2016.

  • Where the FOMC stands

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on the most dovish versus hawkish Federal Reserve members going into 2016.

  • Expect hawkish or dovish Fed?

    CNBC's Steve Liesman shares the results of the latest CNBC Fed Survey which shows how hawkish or dovish the Federal Reserve voting members are likely to be.

  • Stressed unemployed

    Respondents to the latest CNBC Fed survey see a 22 percent chance of a recession in the next year, up from 19 percent last month.

  • Janet Yellen

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on how participants of the CNBC Fed Survey graded Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen.

  • Outlook drops, rate hike less likely: Fed Survey

    Steve Liesman has the exclusive results from CNBC's Fed Survey on the opinions of the nation's top economic professional.

  • Wall Street divided over rate hike: Fed survey

    Steve Liesman has the exclusive results from CNBC's Fed survey on the opinions of the nation's top economic professional.

  • Rate hike on Wednesday? CNBC Survey

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports 95 percent of the 41 respondents of the CNBC Fed Survey predict there will not be a rate hike from the Federal Reserve on Wednesday. CNBC contributor Joe Lavorgna, weighs in.

  • Traders work as Janet Yellen, chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve, is seen speaking on a television screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015.

    After the Fed stuck to its near-zero interest rate policy, expectations have shifted to a December liftoff, a CNBC survey says.

  • Motorcyclist ride by the Federal Reserve Building in Washington, DC.

    Despite market volatility and anxiety over global growth, 49 percent of financial pros see the Fed hiking rates this month, says a CNBC Fed survey.

  • Watching economic warning signs

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports the results of the latest Fed Survey, 24 hours ahead of the Fed announcement.

  • Is Fed rate hike in jeopardy?

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports the exclusive results from a special Jackson Hole edition of the CNBC Fed Survey.

 

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