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These are the 25 most attractive employers in America, according to LinkedIn

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These are LinkedIn's top companies to work for in 2019

Looking for a company that will pay you a competitive salary and provide top-notch benefits and perks? You're not alone.

The employers that land on LinkedIn's 2019 Top Companies list are most attractive to the platform's users. To rank these companies, LinkedIn reviewed the activity of its more than 500 million users, looking at interest from non-employees, engagement with employees, job demand and employee retention. To be eligible for the ranking, companies must have at least 500 employees. LinkedIn excluded itself and parent company Microsoft from the list.

As in previous years, companies in tech, media and finance dominate the list. Alphabet, which ranked No. 2 last year, takes the top spot this year as the most attractive employer of 2019, followed by social media giant Facebook and e-commerce company Amazon, which dropped out of the first place spot it claimed last year.

Read on for the 25 most attractive employers in the U.S.:

25. Wells Fargo

People walk by a Wells Fargo bank branch on October 13, 2017 in New York City.
Spencer Platt | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 258,700

Despite several high-profile scandals in recent years, LinkedIn says that Wells Fargo has taken major steps to rebrand itself by hiring executives in its risk division and removing unrealistic sales targets from its goals.

24. Adobe

Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 11,000

In addition to unlimited vacation time and paid holidays, U.S. employees who have been working at Adobe for five years also get a 20-day sabbatical. Meanwhile, staff members who have been at the company for 10 years get a 25-day sabbatical. After 10 years of employment with the company, employees may take a sabbatical of 30 business days at every five year interval.

23. Slack

Stewart Butterfield, co-founder and chief executive officer of Slack Technologies Inc. at South By Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival on Tuesday, March 15, 2016.
David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 1,200

According to LinkedIn, more than 100 Slack employees have trained and mentored incarcerated peers at San Quentin State Prison as part of the company's coding program, Last Mile. The tech company has also started a year-long initiative called Next Chapter, through which it will hire three Last Mile graduates as quality engineering apprentices.

22. Citi

Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 66,600

According to LinkedIn, Citi was the first U.S. company to publicly share its median pay gap globally, despite the fact that female employees currently earn 29 percent less than men. In an effort to close this gap, the company says it plans to increase female representation in executive roles to 40 percent by 2021.

21. Goldman Sachs

Traders work at Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York.
Scott Eells | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 37,600

In an effort to attract new talent, Goldman Sachs has recently ditched its strict suit-and-tie dress code for more flexible guidelines.

20. ADP

ADP LLC signage is displayed as job seekers wait in line during the TechFair LA job fair in Los Angeles, California.
Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 57,000

According to LinkedIn, roughly 1,400 ADP volunteers in the U.S. recently celebrated the accomplishment of packaging their one millionth meal for Rise Against Hunger. The program is just one of the company's 1,500 global charitable initiatives.

19. Lyft

Lyft President John Zimmer and CEO Logan Green applaud as Lyft lists on the Nasdaq at an IPO event in Los Angeles March 29, 2019.
Mike Blake | Reuters

Number of U.S. employees: 4,000

In Lyft's recent IPO filing, the company promised a majority of its rides would be delivered by its own "low-cost, scalded autonomous vehicle network" within 10 years, according to LinkedIn.

18. Bank of America

Pedestrians pass in front of a Bank of America branch in New York.
Scott Mlyn | CNBC

Number of global employees: 204,000

According to LinkedIn, more than 17,000 Bank of America employees have enrolled in its national "empathy" program, which teaches them how to personalize a customer's experience based on whether they are in early adulthood, parenthood or retirement.

17. The Walt Disney Company

Chief executive officer and chairman of The Walt Disney Company Bob Iger and Mickey Mouse look on before ringing the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange, November 27, 2017 in New York City.
Getty Images

Number of global employees: 201,000

Disney, which is the parent company of ESPN, ABC and Pixar, is one of the few companies that covers education costs for part-time and full-time employees. According to LinkedIn, Disney pays full tuition for part-time workers who are earning a high school diploma, a college degree or going back to school to pick up a new skill.

16. Tesla

GP: Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Tesla Inc., speaks during an event at the site of the company's manufacturing facility in Shanghai, China, on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019.
Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 35,000

Despite the long hours the company has become known for, The Wall Street Journal reports that Tesla is a dream employer for many young job-seekers who are eager to take advantage of some of the perks and benefits, which include driving a Tesla car. According to a PayScale survey, although the work environment can be stressful at times, 89 percent of employees at Tesla believe their work is having a positive impact on the world.

15. Comcast NBCUniversal

Cindy Ord | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 184,000

NBCUniversal is preparing to enter the streaming world with its own ad-supported service in 2020, according to LinkedIn.

14. Spotify

Daniel Ek, chief executive officer and co-founder of Spotify AB.
Akio Kon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 1,800

After acquiring Gimlet Media and Anchor earlier this year, Spotify's CEO Daniel Ek says the company is looking to expand the reach of its original content. Already the streaming company is the second largest podcasting platform on the market.

13. The We Company

A man enter the doors of the 'WeWork' co-operative co-working space in Washington, DC.
Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 6,000

WeWork, which rebranded as The We Company this year, announced that it was banning meat from all corporate events and employee expense reports.

"New research indicates that avoiding meat is one of the biggest things an individual can do to reduce their personal environmental impact — even more than switching to a hybrid car," WeWork's co-founder and chief culture officer Miguel McKelvey wrote in a memo to staff. He added that WeWork could save "over 15 million animals by 2023 by eliminating meat at our events."

12. Cisco

Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 37,500

Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins sent a company-wide email last year explaining that he and the executive team would make mental health, sexual harassment and conscious culture priorities at company. The email followed the deaths by suicide of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade. "Unfortunately, we all know friends, family, and coworkers battling mental health conditions, or maybe you're going through your own struggles," he wrote.

11. Netflix

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings split the company in two in 2011, thinking that the growing ubiquity of high-speed Internet access would soon mean the end of their disruptive DVD mailing business. But neglecting the DVD business proved to be a mistake, and Netflix reversed course.
Ore Huiying | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 5,700

According to LinkedIn, Netflix is looking to move beyond being known as a simple tech company and is instead positioning itself as a content company that has "significant cultural impact."

10. Dell Technologies

Michael Dell, founder and chief executive officer of Dell Inc.
Matthew Busch | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 145,000

Dell Technologies, which is the parent company of Dell, Dell EMC, VMware and RSA Security, has a flexible work policy that has reportedly saved U.S. employees 136 million miles of travel a year.

9. Oracle

Oracle co-CEO Mark Hurd delivers a keynote address during the Oracle OpenWorld on October 23, 2018 in San Francisco, California.
Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 137,000

According to LinkedIn data, roughly 90 percent of Oracle's employees are located outside the company's San Francisco Bay Area headquarters. This in turn, has created hiring surges in U.S. metro areas like Austin, Texas and Los Angeles, California, as well as international locations like India and Romania.

8. Airbnb

Martin Bureau | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 3,000

According to LinkedIn, Airbnb provides its employees with $500 in travel credits each quarter and they're allowed to roll over their balance with no cap on its value.

7. Apple

Tim Cook (center)
Getty Images

Number of global employees: 132,000

In 2018, Apple announced that it plans to create 20,000 new jobs across its existing campuses over the next five years, and that it will invest $1 billion in a new campus in Austin, Texas.

6. Uber

Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 10,000

At Uber, employees are encouraged to move around and explore new roles and responsibilities at the company. In fact, the ride-sharing platform tells LinkedIn that in 2018 alone, over 3,000 employees transferred to a different role, with a third of them taking on a totally different job function and 350 of those employees moving internationally.

5. Deloitte

A view of Deloitte logo in Edmonton's downtown. On Tuesday, September 11, 2018, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Artur Widak | NurPhoto | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 84,900

According to LinkedIn, employees at Deloitte are encouraged to think like entrepreneurs and are even given the opportunity to pitch their business ideas in order to secure funding from the company. In the U.S., roughly 20 ideas have been implemented through the company's Startup Deloitte program.

4. Salesforce

Salesforce co-CEO Marc Benioff speaks at the grand opening of the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco in May 2018. 
David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 22,000

Salesforce currently has over 4,000 open roles in the U.S. According to LinkedIn, not all of them require applicants to have a college degree.

3. Amazon

View of Amazon office
NurPhoto | Getty Images

Number of U.S. employees: 250,000

This past November, Amazon, parent company of Whole Foods, Audible and Zappos, raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour to all of its employees. The company also extended the option of contributing to a 401(k) to all staff members, including part-time and seasonal workers.

2. Facebook

Dominic Lipinski/PA Images/Getty Images

Number of global employees: 36,000

Facebook, parent company of Instagram, Oculus VR and WhatsApp, is known for hiring top-notch candidates to join its staff. The social media giant tells LinkedIn that when interviewing applicants, hiring managers at the company always ask this go-to question: "On your very best day at work — the day you come home and think you have the best job in the world — what did you do that day?"

1. Alphabet

Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks at the company's 2016 Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif.
Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Number of global employees: 98,800

Alphabet, parent company of Google, YouTube and Nest, is investing $13 billion to expand its company presence in the U.S. In a blog post earlier this year, CEO Sundar Pichai, said that "2019 marks the second year in a row we'll be growing faster outside of the Bay Area than in it."

The company says it plans to be present in 24 states by the end of 2019.

Disclosure: Comcast is the owner of NBCUniversal, parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

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