Power Players

Dolly Parton: 'I count my blessings...but I need to count my money too'

John Lamparski | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images

Dolly Parton made working 9 to 5 famous, but the 73-year-old star actually wakes up between midnight and 3 a.m. — to tap into her inspiration.

"She has a magic time, she calls it her 'God time,'" Parton's manager, Danny Nozell, said in the ABC News' documentary "Dolly Parton: Here She Comes Again!," which aired Tuesday. "She is up anywhere from midnight to 2 or 3 in the morning, and she stays up until 8 or 9 in the morning."

"That's where the creative genius comes out and the creative force," Nozell said.

The first thing that Parton does when she wakes up is meditate and "do my little spiritual work," Parton said on NBC's "TODAY" show in November 2018. Then she reviews her schedule and work for the day.

Whatever Parton is doing, it's working. Parton told Robin Roberts in the ABC documentary that she wrote two of her most popular songs, "Jolene" and "I Will Always Love You" in one day in 1972.

"It very well could've been the same night," Parton said. "Because they were back-to-back on the cassette."

"That was a good night," she added.

The album with those songs, called "Jolene," was released in 1974. At that time, the most a country star could make was $500,000 or $600,000 a year, according to a 1977 interview with Barbara Walters that's featured in the documentary.

"[I'd] like to think there's more money to be made than the money I've been making," Parton told Walters. "I've been working too hard, for too long for too little."

And Parton's 1980 song "9 to 5" (from the movie by the same name) is considered by many to be an anthem for equal pay.

"I always felt that I was worth something, and I still do," Parton told Roberts in the ABC News documentary.

In 2018, Forbes reported that Parton made $19 million, which ranked her as one of the highest paid country singers in America.

But of course, "it's not all about the money," Parton told Roberts.

"I count my blessings more than I count my money, but I need to count my money, too," she said.

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